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How hard is unreal engine to learn compared to unity

Mikey freshMikey fresh Posts: 282
NerveGear
edited August 2015 in Support
Gonna invest time learning to develop but which system
Should I learn

Comments

  • Mikey freshMikey fresh Posts: 282
    NerveGear
    Can anyone help
  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 26,156 Oculus Staff
    I think either can be learned if you spend some time with it.

    Unity is fairly easy to pick up, especially if you have done any coding before (even web coding, as Unity can use Javascript). Unreal Engine 4 has a visual scripting language (Blueprint) which may actually make it easier for non-programmers to do basic stuff. For the heavy lifting, UE4 uses C++, so that may be a bit more complex than the Javascript/C# used in Unity.

    The price and license may make a difference to you. Unity has a free version (which now works with the Rift) but some of the cooler features are paid only (it's $1,500 for the Pro version). Unreal 4 is only $19/month (plus royalties if you sell your game) but you get the full source (which you don't with Unity). As a beginner, you probably won't have use for the source code, but this can be important if you are building a serious project and need to customize things for your purpose.

    In addition, UE4 is fairly new, so there are not as many books/tutorials/assets/etc. surrounding it as Unity. So, regardless of how difficult each engine is, it may be more welcoming for a beginner to start with Unity.

    I wouldn't say that one is necessarily better than the other in all cases. Try them out and see what works for you.
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  • andrewtekandrewtek Posts: 976
    Art3mis
    In addition, UE4 is fairly new, so there are not as many books/tutorials/assets/etc. surrounding it as Unity.
    I do not know how many tutorials there are for Unity, but Unreal Engine 4 has a good amount of video training materials:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZlv_N0_O1gaCL2XjKluO7N2Pmmw9pvhE

    On top of that, once you install Unreal Engine, there is a "Learn" tab which has quite a few training projects covering the gamut from particle effects and stylized rendering all the way to blueprints.

    If you are new to UE4, you might want to check out the following videos from the link above:
    - Introduction to UE4 Editor (11 videos)
    - Introduction to Blueprints (9 videos)
    - Introduction to Third Person Blueprint Game (22 videos)

    To get the benefit of these videos, don't just watch them. Instead, play the video while you have the editor open and follow along. Try to do things slightly differently than the videos show to see what happens.

    The first two sets of videos will get you familiar with the environment and blueprints system. The third will have you creating a "real game" with a playable character.

    Once you are done with these, follow along with this video from eVRyday. It will show the basics of creating a scene for the DK2:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdmBBBd20f4


    For extra credit, modify the "Introduction to Third Person Blueprint Game" project so your DK2 follows the character, but turning your head does not rotate the DK2's view around that character.
  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 26,156 Oculus Staff
    OK, maybe I was wrong. I stand corrected. I was basing this more on the book selection. There are quite a few books for Unity on Amazon (for example) but only a couple dealing with Unreal 4. However, it does appear the Unreal has a good amount of video tutorials, so that is a plus.

    I also have more experience playing with Unity than I have with UE4, so maybe that biases my opinion. Though I am looking to beef up my Unreal skills. That is a goal of mine for this year.
    AMD Ryzen 7 1800X | MSI X370 Titanium | G.Skill 16GB DDR4 3200 | EVGA SuperNOVA 1000 | Corsair Hydro H110i
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  • andrewtekandrewtek Posts: 976
    Art3mis
    Oh, if you enjoy the third person tutorial, here is a product/tool that will help you create a unique 3d model and bring it into UE4.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH_LMyJIepw


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_JjBK8ikIk


    I haven not used it, but it looks pretty neat. This other product has some interesting dynamic animations:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qm0IxOUxkDY


    I would like to experiment with both when I have a few free hours. Although, the Mixamo product is probably more in-line with my needs as they have their animations pre-created.

    Then again, this is pretty amazing:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWmdH9sXd3I
  • Mikey freshMikey fresh Posts: 282
    NerveGear
    Thanks guys
  • Mikey freshMikey fresh Posts: 282
    NerveGear
    Am I right in thinking unity would probably
    Be a little easier to pick up but unreal although
    Possibly a steeper learning curve looks the superior
    Engine considering an above average iq how
    Quickly could one have a basic 3d game running in
    Both engines using pre drawn asset also do you
    Have to be good at art and maths to make stuff in say
    Alias maya cheers
  • andrewtekandrewtek Posts: 976
    Art3mis
    In Unreal, you can use a template and have a "game" up in 5 minutes. I would expect Unuty has similar templates. However, a template is unlikely the game you want to make. You need to learn the engine and be comfortable with it to get there.

    As far as which is better, I am not sure that question will lead to a definitive answer. Anyone who invests time in one or the other will tend to defend their investment. Why not download both and do some tutorials in each. What could be more fun on a Saturday morning? Then you can choose based on your personal comfort with each rather than any bias we might have.
  • Mikey freshMikey fresh Posts: 282
    NerveGear
    Thank for the info everyone lots of good feedback
    Will try both and see what gels with me but lots of
    Interesting stuff to enlighten me so once again
    Thanks :)
  • You will find Unity a bit easier if you know basic level programming..
  • tcla75tcla75 Posts: 63
    Hiro Protagonist
    As a total newbe I have been "playing around with unreal" for the last few weeks. As said above you can throw out a simple game in about 5 mins. However I have been having an horrendous time trying to import fbx files that are also interior. On the inside the walls are invisible. I've surfed for hours to try and fix this problem but non is forthcoming. I'm going to throw my hat into unity and if it can inport an fbx file without all the bullshit (invisible walls) then thats where I will nest.
  • andrewtekandrewtek Posts: 976
    Art3mis
    Do your walls have two sides? If not, do you have them set to be visible from both sides? Typically, a poly is 1-sides and only if it's normal is facing the camera will it be rendered.

    If your walls do have two sides, make sure the normals on each side are pointing the correct way.
  • kvickkvick Posts: 16
    tcla75 wrote:
    As a total newbe I have been "playing around with unreal" for the last few weeks. As said above you can throw out a simple game in about 5 mins. However I have been having an horrendous time trying to import fbx files that are also interior. On the inside the walls are invisible. I've surfed for hours to try and fix this problem but non is forthcoming. I'm going to throw my hat into unity and if it can inport an fbx file without all the bullshit (invisible walls) then thats where I will nest.

    Dude just flip your normals, easy fix.
  • wheatgrinderwheatgrinder Posts: 116 Oculus Start Member
    Old thread, but hey.. so what..

    Go with Unity.

    DEEP asset store.
    DEEP support infrastructure..

    In this forum alone:
    Unity Integration 8000+ posts
    Unreal Engine < 2000 posts
  • I'd recommend UE4 on the basis that it generally produces more, to put it gently, graphically "competent" content when used by the community. I use UE4 and even though I'm a beginner it's so easy to make things look beautiful, so to me it's no contest. On the downside I have a pretty good grasp on basic programming and as a beginner I have a harder time dealing with these Blueprint node things, while I could be doing the exact same thing in code much faster.

    Then there's unity 5, which I know nothing about but seems about on par with UE4.

    I only use UE4 so I can't tell you which is easier, and anyone that has learned both engines obviously had an easier time learning the second one so it might be hard to get an unbiased opinion. I would guess that neither are a walk in the park but shouldn't be too hard if you have the time and dedication to sit through many online tutorial videos.

    Edit oops obsolete thread. Oh well, I still stand by this.
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