Re: Brain-reading implant controls arm — Oculus
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Re: Brain-reading implant controls arm

saviorntsaviornt Posts: 1,951
NerveGear
edited May 2015 in General
If anyone follows the biotech industry, this is kind of old news, however, it seems that there is a new story on this particular research:
A man has been able to control a robotic limb with a mind-reading chip implanted in his brain.

It allowed Erik Sorto, from California, to sip a drink unaided for the first time in 10 years.

The details, published in Science, reveal how complex bursts of electrical signals in his brain could be interpreted into commands for the arm.

Experts said the results made brain-controlled robotics closer to being a reality.

Mr Sorto was shot at the age of 21. The damage to his spinal cord left him paralysed from the neck down.
Mind control

Two tiny sensors were implanted into his brain to monitor the activity of around 100 neurons.

Previous attempts at thought-controlled robotics have focused on the motor cortex - the region responsible for the action of individual muscles.

However, the US team tried implanting the chips in the posterior parietal cortex - the part of the brain that comes up with the initial intention.

It is the difference between deciding to pick up a mug or telling your hand to move towards it.

Now, there is a reason that I posted this in general section, and not in the off-topic session. This breakthrough technology will further pave the way into true virtual reality, not this ad-hoc stuff we are working with today. Now that we can use implants in the brain to control electronics, we need a couple more things in the research area:

- True computer vision: this would mean sending visual information to the brain
- Haptics: this is potentially easier than it might first appear
- Temporary paralysis: We have drugs that can do this, however, we need a way for this to be done electronically

These three things though are the scary part about true-vr, and will meet with a multitude of critics. I, myself, am a critic, sort of. There can be no bugs, no errors, no malfunctions. If that can be done, then we will usher in a new era of civilization.

Discuss.

Comments

  • leayleleayle Posts: 7
    Aspects of human motion like proprioception will make simple (?) tracking of movement of actual appendages more realistic than controlling a virtual arm with directly with your brain, I think. Although, if you were simulating something like being a grasshopper, then direct movement of the extra limbs via brain would be a cool thing to have.
  • MradrMradr Posts: 3,367 Valuable Player
    saviornt wrote:
    These three things though are the scary part about true-vr, and will meet with a multitude of critics. I, myself, am a critic, sort of. There can be no bugs, no errors, no malfunctions. If that can be done, then we will usher in a new era of civilization.

    Discuss.

    lol, simple answer: No-thanks!

    There will always be errors and problems with whatever you do. Some one will get sick - die - and blame the last thing they used as the problem (even if it wasn't). Even though it be cool to have true-vr it just wont fly for another 50-100 years. People will use it for the good and bad. The bad is what worries me more than the good when it comes to some of that research, but it will come and humans just will have to get used it as we grow our knowledge of the word around us.
  • VizionVRVizionVR Posts: 3,022
    Wintermute
    Lets take this further.
    I want to use this tech to remote control an android avatar, or "avadroid" (tm) to walk on the surface of Mars.
    This is how we eventually explore deep space. We'll send avadroids out to the stars for our great, great, great, great grandchildren to use for colonization.
    Not a Rift fanboi. Not a Vive fanboi. I'm a VR fanboi. Get it straight.
  • RonsonPLRonsonPL Posts: 1,115
    Trinity





    ;)

    And more seriously: forget about anything VR+direct brain connections. If it even will be mainstream ever, it won't be in our lifetimes, not even our kids and grandkids lifetimes, probably.
    Not an Oculus hater, but not a fan anymore.
    Still lots of respect for the team-Carmack, Abrash.
    Oculus is driven by big corporation principles now. That brings painful effects already, more to come in the future. This is not the Oculus I once cheered for.
  • yazzeyazze Posts: 57
    Brain Burst
    RonsonPL wrote:

    ;)

    And more seriously: forget about anything VR+direct brain connections. If it even will be mainstream ever, it won't be in our lifetimes, not even our kids and grandkids lifetimes, probably.

    It will be in our lifetime, probably at the very end, or for our children.
  • saviorntsaviornt Posts: 1,951
    NerveGear
    We will be able to do it in our lifetime, however, whether or not it will be culturally acceptable to do it is another matter altogether.
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