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OculusSetup.exe says not enough space when space exists

sshirokovsshirokov Posts: 10
NerveGear
I can't get the installer past checking for space on my one and only drive C: in Windows 10 64bit. 

It claims I need 3.05GB, while I currently have 173GB Free.

I don't have any other drives in the system, and am not really sure what else to try.
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Comments

  • sshirokovsshirokov Posts: 10
    NerveGear
    Attaching the `OculusSetup.log`
  • KhiuKhiu Posts: 27
    Brain Burst
    edited April 2016
    Weird, you're getting a lot of file not found exceptions but it doesn't break on that.
    [Error] [4/20/2016 11:59:15 PM] DeviceIoControl() failed with 0 bytes returned.  [0]

    Seems to be the issue here. The only thing I can think of is that it bugs with raid configurations, do you have one?

    Edit: The error doesn't really tell us a lot, maybe check the event viewer and see if it has more info.

  • sshirokovsshirokov Posts: 10
    NerveGear
    Seems to be the issue here. The only thing I can think of is that it bugs with raid configurations, do you have one?

    I don't, but I apparently do have my one and only disk and volume configured as a Dynamic Disk and a Dynamic Volume, for what that's worth.
  • sbryantsbryant Posts: 9
    NerveGear
    I also seem to be having this issue. I have disk disk drives with three volumes and the installer throws an exceptions when enumerating disk drives: 

    Exception when enumerating drives

    Shows up in my logs and I can't get the installer to detect any disks either.

  • bagomojobagomojo Posts: 8
    Yeah mine seems to be choking when enumerating drives..  Could it be that the partitions are GPT and not MBR?

    [Error] [4/21/2016 8:20:11 PM] DeviceIoControl() failed with 0 bytes returned.  [0]
    [Warning] [4/21/2016 8:20:11 PM] Exception when enumerating drives:
    System.Exception: Exception of type 'System.Exception' was thrown.
       at Dawn.Win32.Kernel.IsInternal(DriveInfo driveInfo)
       at Dawn.DawnSession.ScanInstallLocationCandidates()
    [Error] [4/21/2016 8:20:11 PM] DeviceIoControl() failed with 0 bytes returned.  [2]
    [Warning] [4/21/2016 8:20:11 PM] Exception when enumerating drives:
    System.Exception: Exception of type 'System.Exception' was thrown.
       at Dawn.Win32.Kernel.IsInternal(DriveInfo driveInfo)
       at Dawn.DawnSession.ScanInstallLocationCandidates()
  • sbryantsbryant Posts: 9
    NerveGear
    bagomojo said:
    Yeah mine seems to be choking when enumerating drives..  Could it be that the partitions are GPT and not MBR?
    Yeah, all my disks are setup as a GPT 
  • sbryantsbryant Posts: 9
    NerveGear
    There's been no progress on this issue :(
  • sshirokovsshirokov Posts: 10
    NerveGear
    There's been no progress on this issue 

    Same here. I also have no resolution in the support thread either.

    Two different people have just asked for more information, one piece at a time, and not offering a solution. The last one asked for dxdiag (for a can't find the drive issue?!?!) on a Friday afternoon, so I don't anticipate a response until Monday afternoon, and probably asking for something else rather than offering anything resembling a solution.


  • bagomojobagomojo Posts: 8
    Well at least you're getting a response.  :)  Nothing on my post.  Still using my DK2 because, well you know.  But really getting pretty disillusioned when a company can't even get their setup to determine the drive.  
  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 26,156 Oculus Staff
    We're still investigating, but it looks like dynamic disks are having issues right now. Also, see this post about why hard drives may not be detected at all:
    https://forums.oculus.com/community/discussion/comment/369309/#Comment_369309
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  • ColinBColinB Posts: 236
    Nexus 6
    Think of all those crossed fingers those poor bricks and mortar retailers of combo units are walking about with.
    Thinking of all the customers that are facing this.
    And what about those people that are putting together a Computer that was supposed to be compatible!!
    And then putting it up to sell to some guy/gal that just wants to plug it in and use it!
    If you were a retailer..would you want to know?
    Just think yourself lucky that profit is not important to you.
  • SyntheticSynthetic Posts: 704
    Trinity
    I converted one of my HDD to dynamic... it bugs out and is annoying im not doing the other drives!
  • sbryantsbryant Posts: 9
    NerveGear
    We're still investigating, but it looks like dynamic disks are having issues right now

    Issues would be an understatement. Disappointment is really what I'm feeling now. I just got my rift delivery and now I'm looking at an expensive paperweight.

    The issue is literally installing and running the software as designed. The centerpiece of the Oculus universe, Oculus Home, is not available to me and without it the hardware is useless. I do not have this problem with any other piece of software.

  • CreesballCreesball Posts: 72
    Hiro Protagonist
    I know its a pain to do but I would recommend reinstalling windows then give it another go.  At least that way we can rule out any Windows software issues.
  • sshirokovsshirokov Posts: 10
    NerveGear
    I know its a pain to do but I would recommend reinstalling windows then give it another go.  At least that way we can rule out any Windows software issues.

    There is literally zero chance of that happening, that's below and beyond an unacceptable solution.

    I would sooner sell the CV1 on a second market and wait for the alternative to arrive if no actual solution presents itself. :rage: 

    I do not have this problem with any other piece of software.

    I have never as much as seen this class of problem from any software that I have run on any machine, ever.
  • THEM2016THEM2016 Posts: 11
    NerveGear
    sshirokov said:
    I have never as much as seen this class of problem from any software that I have run on any machine, ever.
    No, me neither, but I believe I understand what the devs. are doing.  I'm also getting:
    Dawn.Win32.Kernel.IsInternal(DriveInfo driveInfo)
    exceptions being logged.  Looking through more forum posts than I care to count on a looooooong afternoon, it appears as though the devs. are just being ridiculously picky about on which drives they'll install.  It seems they're trying to work out whether or not the drive will be "fast" enough by looking to see whether it's "internal" (presumably on a SATA/SCSI/SAS/... bus).

    If that's what they're doing, they should stop.  It's not up to an installer to try and work that sort of thing out - for a start, the devs. should not be arrogant enough to think they will know and be able to recognise everything which counts as an "internal" drive.  As has happened here - they apparently can't (though if they're asking for output from DxDiag, perhaps they're thinking "Oh, well if we just add this extra case, and this one, and ... then it will spot the disc ..." as, IIRC, there's a whole bunch of general system info. in the DxDiag reports) ...

    Big hint, dev. folks!  Don't do that!

    Seriously, if you want to make sure the system is "capable" of supporting an Oculus then include a system benchmark test as part of the installation and run it as part of the initial configuration.
    Then you can report anything you might consider an issue at that point, and meanwhile the user will at least have the software installed (and, for example, be able to run more detailed diagnostics if there are any issues).

    Seriously, this is "Software Installation 101" folks - get it right please, you are immensely honking people off here by developing a product which simply will not install on any system which doesn't correspond to "your" idea of what a system should look like ...  You should not be worrying about whether it conforms to your idea of a computer, you should be worrying about whether it is capable when tested.  I.e., a post-installation benchmark ... 

    Cheez ...
  • THEM2016THEM2016 Posts: 11
    NerveGear
    edited April 2016
    THEM2016 said:
    ... simply will not install on any system which doesn't correspond to "your" idea of what a system should look like ...
    And typing that has just reminded me - in the days I have wasted trying to get this to work, one thing I tried was installation on a spare test VM (Virtual Machine) I had lying around.

    Installed on there absolutely fine ...

    So a VM, with no actual physical hardware (I.e. GPU, discs, ...), an RDP console, 1Gb RAM, no USB ports, and a single core CPU - that's apparently absolutely fine for supporting an Oculus.
    My workstation, with 6Gb/s SSDs, 8Gb RAM, AMD 7900 series GPUs, 8x3.2GHz cores, ... - no, the disc drives in there won't be fast enough ...

    Hey developers, see how silly those "Is this machine good enough?" tests are looking to your customers? ...
  • THEM2016THEM2016 Posts: 11
    NerveGear
    edited April 2016
    We're still investigating, but it looks like dynamic disks are having issues right now. Also, see this post about why hard drives may not be detected at all:
    https://forums.oculus.com/community/discussion/comment/369309/#Comment_369309
    So possibly just disable your checks for "Is this drive internal (and therefore likely to be fast enough)?" while you figure it out?

    That would be a trivial "fix" which would at least mean your customers can install your software while you work out for yourselves that the installer failing to check this isn't actually the way to do it ...

    Let's face it, your "... likely to be fast enough" checks simply do not work anyway - they let me install your software in a VM (whose actual virtual discs are stored on mirrored, dynamic, GPT partitioned drives ...) so they obviously don't catch set-ups where speed might be an issue, and break completely on systems where it isn't - not exactly useful in their current form, are they?

    So get rid of them.

    Then figure out for yourselves that what you needed all along (if you felt this really was necessary) was a post-installation benchmark ...
  • THEM2016THEM2016 Posts: 11
    NerveGear
    edited April 2016
    OK, fed up with this, so here's a work-around.
    This seems to have worked fine for me but, of course, YMMV :smile: 

    Instructions are for "Windows 7"; it should work the same way on anything else though.
    <Windows>R
    diskmgmt.msc
    <Enter>

    That will bring up the "Disk Management" snap-in.
    On the "Action" menu, click "Create VHD".
    Enter a suitable location (you're going to want probably at least 5Gb free) and call the VHD something like "HowIWorkedAroundTheOculusBrokenInstaller".  You should use a fixed size.  Enter the size, and remember to change the units from the default of "MB" ...

    Go and get a coffee.  That will take a while, and you may not even see anything happening for the first minute or so.  Eventually, you'll see a progress bar in the bottom-right hand corner; eventually it will get to 100%!  Honestly ...

    "Action" menu again, click "Attach VHD".  If it's greyed out, you were impatient waiting for the last step ...  You will probably be told you can't because it's already attached - that's fine.

    Scroll down in the bottom window and you'll see your new disc.  It'll show some sort of error because it's not yet initialised.  So right-click and "Initialize disk" (if asked whether to use MBR ot GPT, I used MBR, but it shouldn't make any difference), then you can right-click the actual volume and create a "New Simple Volume".
    Default answers for everything, no, don't enable compression, give it a name if you want to (but it doesn't matter), pick a drive letter, ...

    So, you now have a new "Drive" which is really a file stored somewhere on one of your existing discs (so yeah, performance there will be brilliant - must be OK though, because ...)
    Now run the Oculus installer ...  Bingo!  You will now have a nice, shiny, fresh installation.

    OK, realistically, this is an utterly abortionate work-around.  It will leave your software installed on another drive (and a virtual one at that ...) that you didn't want and that you had to create just for this.  You may have to juggle things around to fit all your Oculus downloads on there, so you might have to re-size (or re-create, but that would be ... complicated ... because of running processes etc, so try to avoid that ...) the VHD at some point, then expand the filesystem.
    However hopefully Oculus will fix this, at some point, soon (?) - then you can just (!!!! **BACK EVERYTHING UP** !!!!, then ...) un-install, detach the VHD, ... and re-install properly without this nonsense.

    Hope that helps people! :smile: 

    (Ps.  Do remember though that if you install like this, and then have to contact Oculus support, they'll quite possibly use it as an excuse to get you to run "DxDiag.exe" a few times then tell you a virtual disc isn't a supported configuration ...).
  • sbryantsbryant Posts: 9
    NerveGear
    Wow that's quite an involved work around, but it's also unacceptable, I shouldn't have to create a virtual disk to install Oculus's software. They should just fix the installer to and stop filtering out LDM partitions.
  • THEM2016THEM2016 Posts: 11
    NerveGear
    edited April 2016
    sbryant said:
    Wow that's quite an involved work around, but it's also unacceptable, I shouldn't have to create a virtual disk to install Oculus's software. They should just fix the installer to and stop filtering out LDM partitions.
    Oh, absolutely.  Those checks should never have been put in the installer in the first place.

    Hopefully though, it might be useful for anyone for whom it's (currently) more important to get the darn' software to install at all than whether or not that requires what even I (as the person who came up with it!) described as "an utterly abortionate work-around".
  • sbryantsbryant Posts: 9
    NerveGear
    That's cool. I just want an official response from Oculus in the form of a solution to my installer woes. 
  • sbryantsbryant Posts: 9
    NerveGear
    edited April 2016
    I received this from the support team: 

    Thanks for sticking in there with me while I worked on investigating this issue with my team.
    After testing dynamic drives on our end, we've determined that dynamic drives are not supported by the Oculus software at this time.
    Oculus is working on this problem as we speak and we're actively looking into a solution; however, I have no time frame for when dynamic drives will be allowed during the Oculus Home installation process.
    I ask for your patience as future builds of the Oculus Setup file are added to our official site, and I sincerely apologize for any issues you may face because of dynamic drive compatibility.

    There is no official work around and it might never officially work given how looking into things seem to be going.

  • THEM2016THEM2016 Posts: 11
    NerveGear
    edited April 2016
    They've determined that dynamic drives are not supported at this time.

    I think anyone who has had to come to this thread could have told them that ... and, in fact, have ...

    Sigh ...

    Well thanks for sharing the update anyway - at least now people might have an unofficial work-around ... if they don't laugh themselves silly first :smile: 
  • sshirokovsshirokov Posts: 10
    NerveGear
    I'll give your workaround a try tonight when I'm back at the windows machine, thanks for doing a better job than the developers.

    Well thanks for sharing the update anyway - at least now people might have an unofficialwork-around ... if they don't laugh themselves silly first smile 
  • sshirokovsshirokov Posts: 10
    NerveGear
    OK, realistically, this is an utterly abortionate work-around.

    THEM2016 your work around worked correctly, thanks a lot. You are now more help than the combined knowledge of the tire fire that represents Oculus.

    The fact that this works is pretty fundamental proof that whatever the installer is checking for is not worth the electricity it consumes to run. Whatever clever jackass decided to produce that branch would have used the time wiser watching carpet grow.

    This has been the worst new product experience ever, and I pre-ordered Duke Nukem Forever back in the day.

    Thank you for tuning in to the trainwreck you poor, misguided souls.
  • sshirokovsshirokov Posts: 10
    NerveGear
    edited April 2016

    I have added some mayo to the shit sandwich


    You can use these instructions to get the drive image to mount on boot.

    Then, because the Oculus service fails to start and nothing works because of timing, set the `Startup Type` of the `Oculus VR Runtime Service` from `Automatic` to `Automatic (Delayed Start)`

    I did this by right clicking the start button, going to `Computer Management` then `Services and Applications` -> `Services` -> 'Oculus VR Runtime Service` and in its properties setting the startup type to `Automatic (Delayed Start)`.

    By default, the service will then start 120 seconds after the last automatic service, tunable with `HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\AutoStartDelay` (DWORD, if it doesn't exist). I changed `AutoStartDelay` to 15, and Oculus Home didn't complain when I started it by the time the computer came to a rest after boot.
  • THEM2016THEM2016 Posts: 11
    NerveGear
    sshirokov said:
    Whatever clever jackass decided to produce that branch would have used the time wiser watching carpet grow.
    Watching carpet grow.

    Love it!

    I hope you don't mind, @sshirokov, but I'm swiping that expression - I forsee it being very useful :smile: 
  • sbryantsbryant Posts: 9
    NerveGear
    Then, because the Oculus service fails to start and nothing works because of timing, set the `Startup Type` of the `Oculus VR Runtime Service` from `Automatic` to `Automatic (Delayed Start)` 
    I did this by right clicking the start button, going to `Computer Management` then `Services and Applications` -> `Services` -> 'Oculus VR Runtime Service` and in its properties setting the startup type to `Automatic (Delayed Start)`.
    By default, the service will then start 120 seconds after the last automatic service, tunable with `HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\AutoStartDelay` (DWORD, if it doesn't exist). I changed `AutoStartDelay` to 15, and Oculus Home didn't complain when I started it by the time the computer came to a rest after boot.

    instead of doing this, another action can be added to the task scheduler task that will start the OVRService. 

    Add another action to the task and that task will run a program.

    The program to run is: 

    net

    and the arguments are: 

    start OVRService


    That will start the oculus vr service after mounting the virtual disk image

  • THEM2016THEM2016 Posts: 11
    NerveGear
    edited April 2016
    Sorry folks, obviously missed something - thanks for pointing it out.

    My VHDs already mount automagically, but that might be because I've got "Windows Virtual PC" still hanging around my system; perhaps the start-up of that re-mounts any previously mounted VHDs?  Who knows - I really need to uninstall it at some point anyway ...

    Thanks for adding the extra info.

    --------
    Then I came up with what might be a better solution, but apparently now my posts "require approval" before appearing ... so I'll just edit the information into this post instead (if I'm "approved" for doing that ...) ...
    --------

    Adding ketchup to Sshirokov's mayo. ...

    OK folks, here's a further thought.  I'll try and try it later (unless anyone else tries it first):

    Instead of creating a startup task to mount the VHD, create one that runs:

    Command:
    %COMSPEC%
    Arguments:
    /C "SUBST O: C:\PROGRA~2"

    (where "O:" is the drive letter for the VHD; "C:\Program files (x86)\" - IIRC, that's where the Oculus software will install on a 64-bit system - is what the "C:\PROGRA~2\" represents, which you can check by doing "DIR /X C:\"; for a 32-bit system, use "C:\PROGRA~1\" instead).

    Now, stop the Oculus service ("net stop OVRService"), quit Oculus Home, etc.
    Use "robocopy" to copy the "Oculus" directory from your "O:\" drive to "C:\Program Files (x86)\".  You probably want to use "robocopy" rather than "Windows Explorer" as I'd bet there are funny permissions on the contents ...
    Double check first (my "robocopy" is a little rusty ...) but you'll probably want something like:

    cd /d c:\progra~2
    cd /d o:
    robocopy o:\ c: /copyall /e /r:1 /v

    If that tells you about files it couldn't copy because they were open, you've probably not stopped the Oculus service, or have Oculus Home running, ... - kill them and try again.

    Now, reboot.

    When the system boots, it will map "C:\Program Files (x86)\" to drive "O:\", where previously you had your Oculus Drive (VHD) mounted.  The Oculus software will be back on "C:", where it belongs.  Once you've checked it works, you can even delete the VHD.  No start-up delays or anything required - "C:\" will be present at boot, and you're just making part of that ("C:\Program Files (x86)\") appear as drive "O:\" so the installation path "O:\Oculus\" is still valid.
    The "SUBST" should happen sufficiently quickly that "O:\" will be present when needed for the start of "OVRService".  If not, follow @sbryant 's instructions on adding a second action to the start-up task.

    You will still have a potentially irritating "O:" drive showing up in "Windows Explorer".  If that's an issue, Google for "hide drive windows WWWW" (where "WWWW" obviously represents your Windows version) and you can make it disappear.

    Still messy; still should not be necessary.  At least it removes any continuing need for a VHD (and all the space management issues to which that might lead).
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