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WHY DOES OCULUS REFUSE TO ADD PARENTAL CONTROLS?

SybilishereSybilishere Posts: 4
NerveGear
edited January 2019 in Support
I have seen posts as far back as 2016 of Oculus Rift owners asking OCULUS for parental controls. Here it is 2019 and we also have Oculus Go (and Oculus Quest will be released shortly) and OCULUS continues to ignore this request from it's customers. It is not hard to add two-factor authentication when someone is trying to access the web browser in Oculus. Or just like Android apps where you can install an app that will hide apps or require a pattern or pin in order to access the web or apps you specify.

And  it's not just about hiding or keeping children from accessing inappropriate content on the web in Oculus Go, this applies to ADULT friends and family as well!

 I'm still trying to figure out why Oculus refuses to add  any of these requested features?  It makes no sense to me. Especially since your customers help sell your headsets by allowing people we know access to OUR headsets to demo them, therefore increasing your sales by more consumers  buying your products who normally wouldn't!

Comments

  • MAC_MAN86MAC_MAN86 Posts: 2,262
    Wintermute
    Because they introduced a violence ban on new games last year. As for adult content well it's for the adult buying the contents with their credit cards to only know the PIN. As for porn on the internet well that's for your browser to filter. Try this: talk to your kids and the birds and the bees and it will be such an embarrassment to ever need to know about before school teaches them. Also when they are old enough to be inquisitive, just let them find their own way but knock before you barge into their room!
  • RichooalRichooal Posts: 1,894 Valuable Player
    Put your Rift in "Demo Mode" when the kids are using it.
    If you aren't around, tell them they can't use it till you are. The best parental controls are the ones parental people impose, starting with the "Designed for age 13+" and adding to it.
    i5 6600k - GTX1060 - 8GB RAM - Rift CV1 + 3 Senors - 0 PROBLEMS 1 minor problem
    Dear Oculus, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", please.

  • ZenbaneZenbane Posts: 16,713 Valuable Player
    edited January 2019
    Oculus is not the parent to these children. It is known.

    Parental controls can be done at the networking level, which would apply to every device. That is much smarter. And smarter is what all parents should strive for:
    https://www.netgear.com/home/discover/apps/lpc.aspx

    Are you a fan of the Myst games? Check out my Mod at http://www.mystrock.com/
    Catch me on Twitter: twitter.com/zenbane
  • christineevechristineeve Posts: 1
    NerveGear
    I have seen posts as far back as 2016 of Oculus Rift owners asking OCULUS for parental controls. Here it is 2019 and we also have Oculus Go (and Oculus Quest will be released shortly) and OCULUS continues to ignore this request from it's customers. It is not hard to add two-factor authentication when someone is trying to access the web browser in Oculus. Or just like Android apps where you can install an app that will hide apps or require a pattern or pin in order to access the web or apps you specify.

    And  it's not just about hiding or keeping children from accessing inappropriate content on the web in Oculus Go, this applies to ADULT friends and family as well!

     I'm still trying to figure out why Oculus refuses to add  any of these requested features?  It makes no sense to me. Especially since your customers help sell your headsets by allowing people we know access to OUR headsets to demo them, therefore increasing your sales by more consumers  buying your products who normally wouldn't!

    I'm the parent and I am the controls. I see no reason for Oculus to add another layer on where I am in charge. Parent your kids and I will parent mine. Thanks.
  • wuzpwuzp Posts: 516
    Neo
    It was a "business decision," when FB bought Oculus in 2014, that it would be assimilated into the FB ecosystem.  The minimum age for having a FB account, is 13; which corresponds to an ESRB rating of TEEN.  I don't believe there is any Oculus Store content that warrents an ESRB rating higher than that.
  • Pixie40Pixie40 Posts: 506
    Neo
    edited August 24
    I haven't seen anything in the Rift or Quest stores which would get more then an M rating. Most fall solidly under T or lower. You want something that would get a higher rating, you have to go through Steam. Valve lets practically anything onto their storefront so long as it's (barely) functional.
  • Pixie40Pixie40 Posts: 506
    Neo
    I also fall under the category of "people who think parental control is the responsibility of the parent rather then the hardware manufacturer". I have a few Steam games that I felt were inappropriate to show my brother, who is now 18. When I went up to visit them in June what I did was... I didn't let him access my Steam library. He was able to play Arizona Sunshine and my other Quest games. But not my Steam library which contains things I considered unsuitable for his age of maturity. I let my dad check those out, but if my brother was going to be using the headset, Steam was signed out and Virtual Desktop was shut down.
  • wuzpwuzp Posts: 516
    Neo
    Did they ever port "Virtual Valarie" from the PC to VR? :D
  • Pixie40Pixie40 Posts: 506
    Neo
    Had to google what that was. Gonna go out on a limb and say "probably not". But that's not even the type of game I was referring to.
  • GraodenGraoden Posts: 1
    NerveGear
    And what about adults struggling with a porn addiction?
  • RichooalRichooal Posts: 1,894 Valuable Player
    Graoden said:
    And what about adults struggling with a porn addiction?

    If you have an addiction and acknowledge it, you're probably better off not using a VR headset, or a TV, or a phone. It's not up to the manufacturer of goods to prevent addictions.

    i5 6600k - GTX1060 - 8GB RAM - Rift CV1 + 3 Senors - 0 PROBLEMS 1 minor problem
    Dear Oculus, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", please.

  • synchromesh62synchromesh62 Posts: 318
    Trinity
    edited September 17
    Graoden said:
    And what about adults struggling with a porn addiction?
    What about adults with Gambling addictions, spending Addictions. Agree with @Richooal where does it end.
    You cant stop these things or blame the manufacturer for allowing internet access on a device that typically uses it.
  • ph3xph3x Posts: 1
    NerveGear
    i'm sick of not being able to play anything because your unattended children are running around screaming in my games 
  • MorgrumMorgrum Posts: 1,813 Valuable Player
    I hate EVERYONE!!!

    WAAAGH!
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 6,825 Valuable Player
    edited September 20
    wuzp said:
    It was a "business decision," when FB bought Oculus in 2014, that it would be assimilated into the FB ecosystem.  The minimum age for having a FB account, is 13; which corresponds to an ESRB rating of TEEN.  I don't believe there is any Oculus Store content that warrents an ESRB rating higher than that.
    Exactly, as clearly stated - at least in the Rift manual - VR is not for young children, but for person at least 13 years old. Children should never use VR unsupervised, as they can easily damage themselves (or the equipment). If parents let young children use VR, it should be clear that parents have the full responsibility for 1) what the child is experiencing of content and 2) that the child constantly is kept safe while using VR. 

    Kids have developing brains and may react in different ways - and too strongly - to the massive VR impressions - and we all know this one:


    My 8 year old son often uses VR - I'm there constantly, I choose whatever content he is experiencing. No need for Oculus to build in any parental controls - because parental control is never more than 4 to 8 feet away. Leaving kids to use VR without constant parental supervision would in my mind be a form of child neglect. 
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
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