The TV and Blu-ray player HARDWARE thread — Oculus
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The TV and Blu-ray player HARDWARE thread

RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 1,979 Valuable Player
edited April 16 in Off-Topic
It felt wrong to make a post about TVs and Blu-ray players in the threads about TV shows or the thread about films/movies, maybe it's better to make a new thread where we can discuss hardware aspects of TVs and Blu-ray players. 

I'd be happy to start with some spring cleaning  o:) I've been wondering how to clean my new Sony TV, and I think I just found a nice solution  B)


In fact I just ordered some special (very large) cloths:





I ordered from the US to the EU, now I fear Customs may turn the cloths into something with a value close to solid gold  :#

Ok, this thread isn't really about cleaning - although cleaning is important to keep tellys nice and working - dust is a slow killer! 

Next thing coming up: are high-speed HDMI cables really the same? Some authors have suggested so - and in some cases it may of course be true, like:


Source: https://www.cnet.com/news/why-all-hdmi-cables-are-the-same-part-2/

- and:


Source: https://www.cnet.com/news/4k-hdmi-cables-are-nonsense/

The author goes on:

"It's important to remember, there's no such thing as HDMI cable "versions." There's no such thing as a "HDMI 2.0 cable." The version numbers refer to the HDMI connections in your gear. Which is to say, your TV can have HDMI 2.0 inputs, but your HDMI cable is just an HDMI cable. Any High-speed will do. So even if you bought a High-speed cable when all your gear was 1080p and HDMI 1.4, it will probably work now with 4K HDR and HDMI 2.0a gear."

But I beg to differ - and I just learned it the hard way - the above is simply not (completely) correct. And it lead me into some problems. 

First I have two blu-ray players - the old high-end Blu-ray player from Philips (9700 Fidelio), and that player is connected to my Sony 4K TV using a high-speed HDMI (18Gbps-compatible) cable with ethernet. The other player is Sony X800 4K player and it was connected using a normal HDMI high-speed cable with no ethernet. 

The strange thing - the TV would perfectly identify the Philips 9700 and I could use my Sony TV remote to control the Philips' player - incredibly cool! 

But the Sony X800 wasn't identified at all by the TV, and I could not control the Sony X800 player using the Sony TV remote - that's pretty strange right? The TV and the X800 should be like made for each-other. I contacted Sony support, but they were clueless. Using my male intuition/Spider-sense I ordered a new HDCP 2.2 compliant cable (4K in 60 Hz supported) with ethernet etc. Now a new cable shouldn't make a difference right? - But it did, quite a lot actually. Suddenly my Sony X800 player is perfectly identified by the TV - and now I can control the X800 4K player with my Sony TV remote! I'd swear the image quality also looks better, deeper blacks. Now, I don't know how the X800 works, but if some images are converted to 4K 60 Hz of course that may have an impact on image quality (I just don't think the X800 has sufficiently powerful processors to upscale and output 4K 60 Hz). Or something else is going on. 

The conclusion: even though you can use most/all high-speed HDMI cables to watch 4K HDR movies, the cables aren't the same at all. Some cables will allow for enhanced communication between your TV and the player - and may - or may not - increase image quality (probably mostly important if you wish to enjoy 4K@60Hz using XBox One X or a high-end PC). 

Do get the right cables - and no, they don't need to be expensive, they just need to support the right features, for example:

- HDMI-cable 19pol. connector to 19pol. connector 
- Latest HDMI 2.0 Standard 
- Ethernet function 
- ARC - Audio Return Channel 
- CEC - Consumer Electronics Control 
- Ultra HD 4k 2160p @60Hz (3840 × 2160 P) Resolution 
- Suitable for all digital AV signals including sound 

At least be careful when using old cables even if you do get a nice 4K HDR signal!
Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz boost, 11 Ghz ram); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Oculus Rift CV1 - nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

"Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"

Comments

  • DaftnDirectDaftnDirect Posts: 4,621 Valuable Player
    edited April 16
    I had a similar questions when I was running my HDMI cables in the wall for the TV. They're in a buried trunking so should be rewirable but it's surprising how many cables you end up sticking in it so it'll be a tough job to pull one out now.

    All I could do was get the latest spec cable I could at the time and I agree with you that the cable was spc'd, not just the connection. The latest spec at the time was 1.4 and I was told the 1.4 cable I bought was guaranteed to cope with ethernet, ARC and 3D. No idea if it can do 4K though as I can only get that from the internet, I don't have a 4K player, same deal with HDR. 

    So far remote control of my bluray players via TV (and vice versa) have always worked... Samsung TV with Samsung player, Samsung TV with Yamaha player and now Sony TV with Yamaha Player. I believe the feature is called CEC but different manufacturers call it different things and I've no idea if it's supposed to work with all HDMI cables or was introduced with a certain HDMI spec.
    Intel 5820K OC@4Ghz, Titan X (Maxwell), 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4, ASRock X99 Taichi, Samsung 500Gb 960 Evo M.2, Corsair H100i v2 Cooler, Inateck KTU3FR-4P USB 3 card, Windows 10 Pro v1809 (17763.348)
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 1,979 Valuable Player
    And a fun - maybe - burn-in test comparing OLED, VA and IPS panels. Note that the test is much harder on the TVs than normal use, most OLED owners need not to worry. 

    Results after 2 weeks:


    Everything looks new and shiny - after 40 weeks the OLED had taken permanent burn-in damage:


    After 40 weeks the IPS was still holding up nicely - but it more or less died after 80 weeks, and the OLED had increased the permanent burn-in, sadly:


    My Sony 4K TV has a VA panel, I guess it makes me sleep better at night  B)

    Source for the above results:

    https://www.rtings.com/tv/learn/permanent-image-retention-burn-in-lcd-oled
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz boost, 11 Ghz ram); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Oculus Rift CV1 - nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 1,979 Valuable Player

    So far remote control of my bluray players via TV (and vice versa) have always worked... Samsung TV with Samsung player, Samsung TV with Yamaha player and now Sony TV with Yamaha Player. I believe the feature is called CEC but different manufacturers call it different things and I've no idea if it's supposed to work with all HDMI cables or was introduced with a certain HDMI spec.

    I think that's spot on - seems like I need to go back to HDMI school and update my knowledge :blush: - but I never had the problem before using TV and BD player from the same manufacturer. From Wikipedia:

    "Consumer Electronics Control (CEC) is a feature of HDMI designed to allow users to command and control devices connected through HDMI by using only one remote control. For example, by using the remote control of a television set to control a set-top box and/or DVD player. Up to 15 devices can be controlled. CEC also allows for individual CEC-enabled devices to command and control each other without user intervention."

    I wonder if CEC is used to identify the BD players too - or if the ethernet is used for that... 
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz boost, 11 Ghz ram); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Oculus Rift CV1 - nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • DaftnDirectDaftnDirect Posts: 4,621 Valuable Player
    edited April 16
    I assume that's CEC only and I also think they're supposed to be compatible, regardless of manufacturer. I notice Sony instructions say you need Bravia Sync on both machines but I assume that's just because they want to promote their own equipment.

    I seem to remember Samsung saying something similar when I had one of their TVs so I decided to go for a Samsung BD player to avoid the possibility of it not working. That turned out to be a mistake with reliability of that thing being a real problem. Firmware updates killed 3 different machines (2 the same model & the 3rd a replacement, different model).

    Edit: those burn-in tests were interesting. I guess not surprising with OLED but then I suppose it's a very extreme test. The IPS was surprising though. I'm looking forward to see how micro-LED develops.
    Intel 5820K OC@4Ghz, Titan X (Maxwell), 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4, ASRock X99 Taichi, Samsung 500Gb 960 Evo M.2, Corsair H100i v2 Cooler, Inateck KTU3FR-4P USB 3 card, Windows 10 Pro v1809 (17763.348)
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