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Oculus Go for College classroom use

CalidusCalidus Posts: 3
NerveGear
I work at a college and the architectural department wants to get over a dozen VR headsets for Lumion (to view their projects in VR).
I suggested the Go, but now I am concerned because I am reading that it needs a phone to set up or work?
I'd rather not spend $400 each for the Quest, when all they will be doing is looking at 360 panorama photos, essentially... but if the Go requires phones, then I don't see how hta would work out well in the classroom without the students having to use their own phones, and some may not have a compatible phone, etc.
Any thoughts or suggestions? Thanks.

Comments

  • Hiro_Protag0nistHiro_Protag0nist Posts: 4,978 Valuable Player
    Calidus said:
    I work at a college and the architectural department wants to get over a dozen VR headsets for Lumion (to view their projects in VR).
    I suggested the Go, but now I am concerned because I am reading that it needs a phone to set up or work?
    I'd rather not spend $400 each for the Quest, when all they will be doing is looking at 360 panorama photos, essentially... but if the Go requires phones, then I don't see how hta would work out well in the classroom without the students having to use their own phones, and some may not have a compatible phone, etc.
    Any thoughts or suggestions? Thanks.

    You just need an Android or Apple phone to set it up - once, at the beginning.

    Might be able to use just the one - i'm not totally sure about that though?
  • kojackkojack Posts: 6,371 Volunteer Moderator
    I've had three go's all bound to my one phone and then had my students developing on them. During general use, the only purpose for the phone is to turn developer mode on/off (you need to turn dev mode off to access the Go as a storage device).

  • MowTinMowTin Posts: 1,916 Valuable Player
    I guess being able to walk around your creation in VR will be very useful for architects and interior designers. 

    Won't you be better off with a Quest since it has 6DOF? 
    i7 9700k 2080ti   CV1, Rift-S, Index
  • Hiro_Protag0nistHiro_Protag0nist Posts: 4,978 Valuable Player
    MowTin said:
    I guess being able to walk around your creation in VR will be very useful for architects and interior designers. 

    Won't you be better off with a Quest since it has 6DOF? 

    Agreed.  Hopefully, you'll be able to do so much more with the Quest.  Obviously they are double the price but if you can stretch, at least get some Quests.
  • kojackkojack Posts: 6,371 Volunteer Moderator
    Calidus said:
    I suggested the Go, but now I am concerned because I am reading that it needs a phone to set up or work?
    I'd rather not spend $400 each for the Quest, when all they will be doing is looking at 360 panorama photos, essentially... but if the Go requires phones,
    The Quest also needs a phone. From the store page:
    "Setup requires an iPhone (iOS 10 or higher) or Android™ (6.0 Marshmallow or higher) smartphone, the Oculus App (free download), 802.11 b/g/n wireless Internet access, and an Oculus account."

  • CalidusCalidus Posts: 3
    NerveGear
    MowTin said:
    I guess being able to walk around your creation in VR will be very useful for architects and interior designers. 

    Won't you be better off with a Quest since it has 6DOF? 

    Agreed.  Hopefully, you'll be able to do so much more with the Quest.  Obviously they are double the price but if you can stretch, at least get some Quests.
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but unfortunately I think Lumion only does 360 panorama stills, and not true live 3D rendered scenes.
  • kevinw729kevinw729 Posts: 5,148 Valuable Player
    There are better HMD's to use for classroom deployment - with the key elements needed for this environment. We wrote a feature on these systems previously:

    https://www.vrfocus.com/2018/01/the-virtual-arena-vr-gets-schooled/

    urdgfqqehbbb.png
    ** Second New Book **
    "The Out-of-Home Immersive Entertainment Frontier: Expanding Interactive Boundaries in Leisure Facilities"
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Out-Home-Immersive-Entertainment-Frontier/dp/1472426959
  • CrashFuCrashFu Posts: 1,756 Valuable Player
    Dang it Kevin, stop trying to sell other companies' headsets here! You get a commission off those or something?
     :tongue:

    *ahem*  To @Calidus :  A benefit of the phone link-up is that you can also mirror what someone in their headset is seeing to the screen of the registered phone.   That could make it MUCH easier to work with your students,  any time you need to see what they're seeing.. 

    Saves the trouble of having them hand you the headset so you can put it on yourself (and deal with another person's face sweat before it's had time to dry out. Yuck.)   or of having to play "telephone tech support".

    I don't know if other mobile headsets offer that sort of function, but it's definitely a useful feature on the Go and Quest.

    It's hard being the voice of reason when you're surrounded by unreasonable people.
  • kevinw729kevinw729 Posts: 5,148 Valuable Player
    CrashFu said:
    Dang it Kevin, stop trying to sell other companies' headsets here! You get a commission off those or something?
     :tongue:
    .....

    Ha! - seriously, the Oculus Go is great, but the curriculum content is essential for education application, as well as the need for teacher control of the class - the Go just does not have these feature. I am sure they are simple to add but at the moment OculusVR has shown no interest in including this element. But you never know @CashFu they may change their mind.  B)
    urdgfqqehbbb.png
    ** Second New Book **
    "The Out-of-Home Immersive Entertainment Frontier: Expanding Interactive Boundaries in Leisure Facilities"
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Out-Home-Immersive-Entertainment-Frontier/dp/1472426959
  • Hiro_Protag0nistHiro_Protag0nist Posts: 4,978 Valuable Player
    Calidus said:
    MowTin said:
    I guess being able to walk around your creation in VR will be very useful for architects and interior designers. 

    Won't you be better off with a Quest since it has 6DOF? 

    Agreed.  Hopefully, you'll be able to do so much more with the Quest.  Obviously they are double the price but if you can stretch, at least get some Quests.
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but unfortunately I think Lumion only does 360 panorama stills, and not true live 3D rendered scenes.

    No idea, I was thinking of you possibly wanting to use it for other applications in the future.
  • CalidusCalidus Posts: 3
    NerveGear
    CrashFu said:
    Dang it Kevin, stop trying to sell other companies' headsets here! You get a commission off those or something?
     :tongue:

    *ahem*  To @Calidus :  A benefit of the phone link-up is that you can also mirror what someone in their headset is seeing to the screen of the registered phone.   That could make it MUCH easier to work with your students,  any time you need to see what they're seeing.. 

    Saves the trouble of having them hand you the headset so you can put it on yourself (and deal with another person's face sweat before it's had time to dry out. Yuck.)   or of having to play "telephone tech support".

    I don't know if other mobile headsets offer that sort of function, but it's definitely a useful feature on the Go and Quest.

    So I assume we would want to buy one phone to manage these for the instructor? 

    Also, how do you get the files (in this case the Lumion 360 photos) onto the Oculus Go headset?

  • Hiro_Protag0nistHiro_Protag0nist Posts: 4,978 Valuable Player
    nawak390 said:
    I have to say something about that. To be honest, I don't think that this is a good idea to use Oculus Go in college. As for me, you would better try edusson.com paper writing or at least read a review about it. VR is not for education, it is mostly for entertainment purposes. As for me, it is a bad idea of combining VR technology and education. I'm writing this despite it is a VR forum ). What do you think?

    Well, I think most universities in Britain probably have some sort of VR.  Game development, engineering, BIM, optical research, medical etc etc. - all putting VR to great use.
  • MikeFMikeF Posts: 947
    3Jane
    nawak390 said:
    I have to say something about that. To be honest, I don't think that this is a good idea to use Oculus Go in college. As for me, you would better try edusson.com paper writing or at least read a review about it. VR is not for education, it is mostly for entertainment purposes. As for me, it is a bad idea of combining VR technology and education. I'm writing this despite it is a VR forum ). What do you think?

    Well, I think most universities in Britain probably have some sort of VR.  Game development, engineering, BIM, optical research, medical etc etc. - all putting VR to great use.
    he's just spamming his cheat at school services, not a real thought.
  • kojackkojack Posts: 6,371 Volunteer Moderator

    MikeF said:
    he's just spamming his cheat at school services, not a real thought.
    Yep, and banned. (Hell, it wasn't even a good cheating service, their reviews say their quality is garbage)

    Calidus said:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but unfortunately I think Lumion only does 360 panorama stills, and not true live 3D rendered scenes.
    Yep, it looks like Lumion can only do static 360 panoramas, that mode isn't compatible with it's video render and it definitely can't do free vr movement.
    (Note: this one comment was sitting in my draft post buffer since may and I forgot to send it. Maybe Lumion has updated since I looked at it. The rest of this post was written today)


    kevinw729 said:
    Ha! - seriously, the Oculus Go is great, but the curriculum content is essential for education application, as well as the need for teacher control of the class - the Go just does not have these feature.
    For general educational use, yep. Trying to run a class with high school kids or show simultaneous videos or something requires better software support (or more control like Oculus for Business seems to offer).
    But this thread is about college students rendering panoramas of architectural models and viewing them in VR. For that a Go is fine. You don't even need any custom software, just upload the images to the Go and run Oculus Gallery.

    MowTin said:
    I guess being able to walk around your creation in VR will be very useful for architects and interior designers. 

    Won't you be better off with a Quest since it has 6DOF? 

    Agreed.  Hopefully, you'll be able to do so much more with the Quest.  Obviously they are double the price but if you can stretch, at least get some Quests.
    If the headsets are being bought specifically for Lumion, then a Quest isn't going to be value for money. A Go is fine.
    But if there's chances of being used for other purposes, maybe. If students made their scenes in Unreal or Unity, they could have true VR scenes they can move around. At my college the animation students use VR to view scenes made with Unreal and 3DS Max. You get a much better sense of scale with 6DOF.
    So if it's just Lumion or similar panorama software, Go is fine.
    I'd recommend having a look at TwinMotion though. It's an Unreal based architectural visualisation program that can do panoramas, 360 videos and even stand alone VR apps, and imports from common CAD software. But I don't know if it can build Quest apps, probably not. So either a full PC VR headset or a Quest with link cable would suit it.


    On the issue of phones, I just want to make sure anybody new reading this understands how they work for this kind of use.
    You only really need the phone when setting up. It's used to bind the oculus account to the headset and change developer mode. After that, the phone doesn't need to be anywhere near the headsets. One phone and one Oculus account can set up any number of Go's. I've loaned my Go and Quest to students (for up to 4 weeks at a time) and they have no problem using them to develop without my phone nearby. My college's Go's are bound to the phone of my department head, we've never had to ask him to bring his phone to the class.
    The one situation where we had trouble was when my student took my quest home, connected to wifi, and the Quest did an update which turned off developer mode. He couldn't turn it back on because you need the phone for that. But that's because he was doing development for it. For general use that's not needed.


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