Concerning 2.3.1 and 16GB vs 32GB of RAM — Oculus
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Concerning 2.3.1 and 16GB vs 32GB of RAM

AkendolfrAkendolfr Posts: 6
NerveGear
So ever since I got the new Rift S I had been spending a lot of time in Oculus Medium, which has also led me to get into Blender as well. Even though I haven't really has any major problems using Medium, I have notice that when I make my model at a much higher resolution then things start to slow down quite a bit. One major thing that emphasizes this is the move tool. Using the move tool becomes pretty inconvenient as it sometime causes the loading logo to appear every time I use it (especially if it is on Elastic Mode).

According to the latest update, 2.3.1, there are supposed to be some performance improvements. One thing it mentions is being able to sculpt at much higher resolutions than before. Honestly, I haven't notice a difference when I've been using. Performance and resolution limitations seem to be the same as before the latest update. As for VRAM usage I can't really say if that has changed as I don't really monitor it as I use the Rift.

So I suppose this leads me to my next concern. I've read some posts in the past saying that there would be a benefit to having 32GB of RAM. Now if that is really the case then I would consider actually getting 32GB to hopefully improve my sculpting, but I just need it to be properly confirmed by people who actually know before I go ahead and spend £140 on parts I may not actually need.

So after all that noise, here is the actual question: Will upgrading to 32GB of RAM actually improve things, or is it not worth it?

Sorry. It's a long post, but I really do love sculpting in VR and I want to make sure I can have the best experience possible.

For anyone who is curious about my specs:

i7-8700, using turbo boost (4.3ghz on all cores)
16GB RAM 2133Mhz
RTX 2070
480GB SSD

Thanks :)

Comments

  • hughJhughJ Posts: 27
    Brain Burst
    edited July 21
    The simplest thing is to open up your task manager while using Medium and pin the desktop window to your side and watch it while you sculpt.  The Move tool (especially the Elastic mode) seems very CPU intensive, so you can definitely get the marching Medium icon to pop up when trying to manipulate a big/high-res volume of clay.  More ram should only be a thing if you're finding yourself unable to add more layers or increase layer resolution because you're running out of memory.

    I just started Medium and loaded up an existing big sculpt (1-2 GB .sculpt file, much of it in a single layer) to do some testing:
    On task manager I can see all my cores/threads (4/8) more or less pegged while starting an Elastic Move.  I also see my 32GB of system RAM less than half full.  I was able to duplicate all the sculpt layers 4-5 times and system RAM seemed to climb slowly, but handle it easily (pretty sure I couldn't do that a year ago).  After a couple hours of more fiddling with that sculpt I did see my system memory climb to the max, and Medium eventually gave me its memory warning.

    I only have a 4 core 6700k @ 4.5, so someone else here will need to chime in with how well it scales to 16 cores and beyond, but it's probably a good bet that it'll utilize as many threads as you throw at it.  That being said, when you consider what is actually going on when you're doing a large brush Elastic Move operation on a high-res layer, it's gotta be the worst case scenario in terms of cache friendliness because the CPU is having to transform and interpolate hundreds of megabytes worth of voxels and color data -- there's probably cache misses out the wazoo.  More cores will be faster, but I don't think that heavy of an operation will ever be without several seconds of delay simply due to how much data is having to be shuttled up and down.  Seems like the sort of task that'd be more suited for GPU compute and VRAM.

    and my specs:
    6700k @ 4.5
    32GB 3200
    Gef1080
  • AkendolfrAkendolfr Posts: 6
    NerveGear
    Thanks for the reply :)

    Yeah I did do some simple testing where I would constantly increase the resolution on my sculpt to see what would happen to my memory usage. I did get the memory warning and I think my usage was around 12gb out of the 16gb I have. While I can't really upgrade my CPU without having to upgrade my PSU and having to buy a bigger pc case to accommodate a bigger cooler I can easily get the extra RAM I need.

    I've also noticed the slow operation of the Elastic Move Tool as well. I tend to just avoid using it and just stick to normal move.
  • hughJhughJ Posts: 27
    Brain Burst
    When you think about what the Elastic Move is doing compared to the regular Move, it actually makes sense why it's so much more processing/data intensive.  With the Move tool you're only manipulating the voxel data that's inside your brush volume, whereas with the Elastic Move it's having to stretch and squeeze what's outside of the brush in addition to that, so you're probably manipulating like 5x the amount of voxels as you are with the regular Move.

    Makes me curious if Medium might be a case where the quad/hex channel memory buses on the HEDT systems are actually useful.

    I'm definitely not complaining about either Move tool though -- I use them more than anything else.  You get cleaner surface smoothing from it than you do the Smooth tool.  It allows you to get sharp creases and folds far more easily and with better results than the original Clay/Smooth/Inflate trio.  I feel I have way more control for adding lumps of clay (by pulling and expanding a blob) because it gives you the live preview of the adjustmentwhereas with Clay the sculpting process is total trial and error (add, undo, add, undo, add... subtract, subtract, undo, undo, undo, add, smooth, smooth, smooth, etc.)

    The place where I use the Elastic Move most tends to be before I go from medium res to higher res.  If I were sculpting a bust for example: I usually start with Clay to very very roughly block out the shape of a head (10-20 seconds).  Then I roughly Smooth/Fill over any sharp corners that are jutting out.  Then use Move and Elastic Move for much of the basic shaping.  Once I'm happy I'll jack up the resolution to do fine details and painting.  
  • AkendolfrAkendolfr Posts: 6
    NerveGear
    Pretty much how I've been approaching my projects so far. Starting off a low res and then increasing it when I want to move onto finer and finer details. It's a shame there is no actual crease brush like with programs such as ZBrush or Blender. Seems like a lacking feature that would definitely be helpful.
  • ParhelionParhelion Posts: 33
    Brain Burst
    Akendolfr said:
    It's a shame there is no actual crease brush like with programs such as ZBrush or Blender. Seems like a lacking feature that would definitely be helpful.
    I honestly think this feature is something their working on.
  • AkendolfrAkendolfr Posts: 6
    NerveGear
    Parhelion said:
    Akendolfr said:
    It's a shame there is no actual crease brush like with programs such as ZBrush or Blender. Seems like a lacking feature that would definitely be helpful.
    I honestly think this feature is something their working on.
    Perhaps they can replace the Swirl brush with it :p
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