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Your kids VR accidents

WildtWildt Posts: 2,208 Valuable Player
edited March 22 in General
Just experienced the first one in this household, and I'm curious if you fellow parents have similar stories to share! 
I don't have a video, and I doubt her mum would allow me to post it anyway.

Anywho, my youngest daughter (8y) has always been a scary combo of fearless and clumsy, so I've always been cautious whenever she played anything roomscale. Always preaching to respect the guardian boundaries etc.
But last night I let her and her big sister sit on the couch playing that PvP game in Playroom VR where the pancake player is controlling a 3rd person character who has to fling objects at the VR player who has to physically dodge.

The youngest was in VR, and she's short, so her legs doesn't touch the floor. I was in the kitchen and all of a sudden I hear this loud thud. I come into the living room to witness that the poor thing had absolutely faceplanted the floor so hard she hadn't even started crying yet (you KNOW it's bad when the crying is delayed).  :scream:
After some comforting she was fine again, and eager to play some more, although as the pancake player :relieved:
She did get a black eye and a scratch on the forehead though. Must've been the edge of the lenses  :grimace:
PCVR: CV1 || 4 sensors || TPcast wireless adapter || MamutVR Gun stock V3
PSVR: PS4 Pro || Move Controllers || Aim controller
WMR: HP Reverb

Comments

  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 4,865 Valuable Player
    Hope she's still alright!

    My youngest son is 8 yo, has been playing VR since he was 6. Never had any accidents, but I never leave him when he's in VR. Same goes for his now 4 years older brother, don't want them to risk falling or hammer the controllers into a wall, lol. 

    My youngest son easily gets motion sickness in a car or bus, but he can be in VR for more than 1 hour and never got VR motion sickness, quite strange.  
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • pyroth309pyroth309 Posts: 1,627 Valuable Player
    edited March 22
    It's not my kid but the nephew of my wife.

    A couple of months after I first got my Rift her relatives stayed with us for a week visit. I let her nephew try VR and he loved it and that's all he wanted to do was play VR, constantly. Well, after a few days of playing he wanted to try Raw Data. I was like yea whatever, play what you want. I grab a plate of food and I'm sitting in my man cave unable to see him but can see the monitor of what he's doing. After about 10 minutes of playing I hear a loud boom. I yelled out, what was that? Did you hit the wall? No answer. Put my plate down and go in there and he's on the floor spasming like he was having a seizure. Eyes wide open and lifeless. I yelled out to his mom asking if he was epileptic and she's like no why, and I'm like because he's on the floor non-responsive and spasming. I checked his vitals and he was breathing, albeit barely. I suspected he was knocked out but the convulsing confused me. I went ahead and called 911 to be on the safe side.

    A policeman showed up in about 2 minutes which was nice and right about the time he got there, her nephew started waking up and stopped seizuring. I told him to be still and don't move and asked if anything hurt. I was most worried about his neck because he was lying awkward. He said nope. I let the policeman take over and he started questioning him with random facts that he should know and he answered all of them. I told them to go ahead and take him to the hospital to get checked out just to be safe and I offered to pay for the ambulance as the family doesn't make a lot of money.

    Long story short, no concussion just a clean knock out. The reason he was convulsing is that he was drinking energy drinks and mountain dew all day and his nerves were overstimulated... :D

    He didn't have any recollection of the fall, brain dumped that info but from what I can tell he lost his balance and fell backwards and his head whipped into the wall and knocked him out cold.

    Needless to say, I drank about a case that night and that was the end of his VR playing.
  • WildtWildt Posts: 2,208 Valuable Player
    @pyroth309 OMG! That must'be been one helluva nerve wrecking experience! Thank god nothing happened :relieved:
    PCVR: CV1 || 4 sensors || TPcast wireless adapter || MamutVR Gun stock V3
    PSVR: PS4 Pro || Move Controllers || Aim controller
    WMR: HP Reverb
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 4,865 Valuable Player
    Yup - hard to top that story, but great to learn from it - never to leave kids in VR alone. 

    Oculus warns about letting kids under 13 use VR. Personally I don't think it'll affect their brain development in any bad way, but kids might get too immersed - either lose balance or smash into stuff. 

    Also may youngest son kept wanting to hit the dog in Shadow Legend with his sword - we had a long conversation about what's ok and what's not ok even in VR - so there's that too - too much freedom for too young minds, lol. 
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • pyroth309pyroth309 Posts: 1,627 Valuable Player
    He was 15 and a football player/athletic. Even if I was watching him I couldn't have reacted in time unless I was behind him the whole time spotting. He had also played for days without any incidents so at that point my concern was low. I had went through the super cautious phase by the 2nd day lol. He was playing as the sword guy in raw data and apparently got too carried away.
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 4,865 Valuable Player
    pyroth309 said:
    He was 15 and a football player/athletic. Even if I was watching him I couldn't have reacted in time unless I was behind him the whole time spotting. He had also played for days without any incidents so at that point my concern was low. I had went through the super cautious phase by the 2nd day lol. He was playing as the sword guy in raw data and apparently got too carried away.
    Agreed, he should not need any monitoring - I'm primarily thinking about those with little experience or under about 13.  
    And kids and newbies don't use Index, they use CV1  o:);) As I said to a friend, if you're new to VR, you probably won't even notice any SDE because the visual experience will overrule everything  B)
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • pyroth309pyroth309 Posts: 1,627 Valuable Player
    edited March 23
    RuneSR2 said:
    pyroth309 said:
    He was 15 and a football player/athletic. Even if I was watching him I couldn't have reacted in time unless I was behind him the whole time spotting. He had also played for days without any incidents so at that point my concern was low. I had went through the super cautious phase by the 2nd day lol. He was playing as the sword guy in raw data and apparently got too carried away.
    Agreed, he should not need any monitoring - I'm primarily thinking about those with little experience or under about 13.  
    And kids and newbies don't use Index, they use CV1  o:);) As I said to a friend, if you're new to VR, you probably won't even notice any SDE because the visual experience will overrule everything  B)
    Well, I've seen several people posting that the first VR headset they've ever tried was Index because of Half Life. This happened on my CV1 and it was really new but the HMD is irrelevant. It actually took a huge beating from this incident and left marks on the rail side and on one of my touch controllers but it was functional. Tho, i think if it had happened in index or Rift-S or odyssey, he probably wouldn't have been knocked out as the plastic halo would have taken most of the damage as it appeared he hit the back of his head.

    I never posted about it because there was a bunch of people saying VR was unsafe at the time on reddit with people damaging things and breaking appliances and such at the time and I didn't want to pile on...but it's a true story lol. I believe it happened before I ever made a post here, if not it was right after I started posting.

  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 4,865 Valuable Player
    Oh, kids and newbies use CV1 and no Index, because if they fall or smash a controller or the hmd into something, I'd rather sacrifice the CV1  :D I only allow myself to smash the Index controllers into walls - which I've done a few times with no problems  o:) You don't get to drive the Ferrari as long as you're not safely driving the Toyota, lol. 


    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
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