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Not about VR, but a monitor resolution question that's really bugging me.

RedRizlaRedRizla Posts: 7,387 Valuable Player
edited July 12 in Off-Topic
I have a 4k Samsung television that is capable of running 2k at 120 Hz and 4k @ 60 Hz. On my Nvidia control panel I have the resolution set to 4k @ 60Hz. Now for the question. If I leave the Nvidia control panel set at 4k 60Hz and just set the in games setting to 2k resolution, then will I still get the [email protected] 120 Hz, or will it be 2k @ 60Hz? Or do I also have to set the desktop resolution in the Nvidia control Panel to [email protected] 120Hz, while also settings the in the game settings to 2k @ 120Hz?
I hope this makes sense to someone and they can help with this :D

Comments

  • MushroomiesMushroomies Posts: 200
    Nexus 6
    edited July 13
    Yep, Make since,
    I too use a 4K Big Screen Television for a monitor. What I do is I set my Nividia Control panel at 1080p 1920 at 1080, at 60Hz If I go with a higher resolution, I can not read my computer screen because it shrinks the size of everything. Keep in mind, This setting is only for looking at your computer screen and Browser. It does not change what a program can do. For example, I have a number of Graphic Art Programs that can render very high 4K resolution and can do so with the Nvidia Control panel setting left the way they are. I do not need to change my resolution to create a 4K work of art. You do not have to change the Nividia settings to view a 4k Video. 
    Consider this as well, Your VR headset is kind of a mini monitor. It will only do what the Game or program is allowed to do when it was created as far as resolution and the spec of the VR Headsets resolution. Your Television as a monitor settings is very different than your VR Headset. On my Games setting, I let the program decide.
    Oh, I want to add one more thing. These graphic cards can put out a super fine resolution and sure pictures look good in those resolutions but that does not mean you need to use those super fine resolutions. Try reading a monitor with the resolution maxed out. You cant unless you are about a foot away. These resolutions are there for when needed. Anyway, This is what works for me.
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 5,905 Valuable Player
    Unfortunately, I can't answer that question - my rig is in the man cave, 4K TV is in the living room, I've never tried to connect the two :blush: Then again, I really do not play pancake games anymore.
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • MushroomiesMushroomies Posts: 200
    Nexus 6
    edited July 13
    RuneSR2 said:
    Unfortunately, I can't answer that question - my rig is in the man cave, 4K TV is in the living room, I've never tried to connect the two :blush: Then again, I really do not play pancake games anymore.
    Well, My Television is not a Samsung television but it is 4K, I do have a Samsung 4K disc player. Watching a 4K movie is like stepping into the Television. When you use a 4K Television as a Monitor and you have a Very large 50 inch or bigger Television, You can kick back across the room with a Wireless Keyboard and Mouse and just surf the web in comfort laying on the couch or recliner. I watch most of my Television shows and Movies online and you can stream 4K movies on line. There is some really great advantages with using a 4K Television as a monitor. With just a click of a button I can go to working on my computer to watching my Television 
    As I reply to your Post now, My Monitor (Television) Is on the other side of the room and I can see everything clearly
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 5,905 Valuable Player
    edited July 13
    RuneSR2 said:
    Unfortunately, I can't answer that question - my rig is in the man cave, 4K TV is in the living room, I've never tried to connect the two :blush: Then again, I really do not play pancake games anymore.
    Well, My Television is not a Samsung television but it is 4K, I do have a Samsung 4K disc player. Watching a 4K movie is like stepping into the Television. When you use a 4K Television as a Monitor and you have a Very large 50 inch or bigger Television, You can kick back across the room with a Wireless Keyboard and Mouse and just surf the web in comfort laying on the couch or recliner. I watch most of my Television shows and Movies online and you can stream 4K movies on line. There is some really great advantages with using a 4K Television as a monitor. With just a click of a button I can go to working on my computer to watching my Television 
    As I reply to your Post now, My Monitor (Television) Is on the other side of the room and I can see everything clearly
    Fully agree, but I've got a Sony 85" 100/120 Hz 4K tv with 1000 Hz MotionFlow and a Sony X800 4K player, it's awesome for 4K movies, but I can't see myself using it as a normal monitor ;) I have dual monitors for my home-office pc, when they die I might get a 4K 50". (I use a Samsung 51" 3D plasma for the VR rig, but it's 1080p).  
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • RedRizlaRedRizla Posts: 7,387 Valuable Player
    edited July 13
    I game on this television because it is much better to just kick back like @Mushroomies said and relax. I used to sit at a desk, but my god was it painful and not good for my back. Playing games on a 55 inch 4K television can be really immersive. I find it much better than say looking at a 27 inch, which doesn't bring any immersion at all.
  • MushroomiesMushroomies Posts: 200
    Nexus 6
    RuneSR2 said:
    RuneSR2 said:
    Unfortunately, I can't answer that question - my rig is in the man cave, 4K TV is in the living room, I've never tried to connect the two :blush: Then again, I really do not play pancake games anymore.
    Well, My Television is not a Samsung television but it is 4K, I do have a Samsung 4K disc player. Watching a 4K movie is like stepping into the Television. When you use a 4K Television as a Monitor and you have a Very large 50 inch or bigger Television, You can kick back across the room with a Wireless Keyboard and Mouse and just surf the web in comfort laying on the couch or recliner. I watch most of my Television shows and Movies online and you can stream 4K movies on line. There is some really great advantages with using a 4K Television as a monitor. With just a click of a button I can go to working on my computer to watching my Television 
    As I reply to your Post now, My Monitor (Television) Is on the other side of the room and I can see everything clearly
    Fully agree, but I've got a Sony 85" 100/120 Hz 4K tv with 1000 Hz MotionFlow and a Sony X800 4K player, it's awesome for 4K movies, but I can't see myself using it as a normal monitor ;) I have dual monitors for my home-office pc, when they die I might get a 4K 50". (I use a Samsung 51" 3D plasma for the VR rig, but it's 1080p).  
    85 inch 4K? My god, You have a Movie Theater, Yes, I agree, Using that for a Monitor is a bit much. You have what I think of as a Dream set up. Sure I dream about having something like what you have. :o
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 5,905 Valuable Player
    Thanks any yes, I really think clarity, frames per second and colors are much better than a normal theater, but of course the screen still is smaller, lol.

    Btw having MotionFlow or similar tech enabled really should work almost perfectly turning 30 or 60 fps into 120 fps - there're some YouTube videos showing that effect when gaming on TVs.
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 5,905 Valuable Player
    RedRizla said:
    I have a 4k Samsung television that is capable of running 2k at 120 Hz and 4k @ 60 Hz. On my Nvidia control panel I have the resolution set to 4k @ 60Hz. Now for the question. If I leave the Nvidia control panel set at 4k 60Hz and just set the in games setting to 2k resolution, then will I still get the [email protected] 120 Hz, or will it be 2k @ 60Hz? Or do I also have to set the desktop resolution in the Nvidia control Panel to [email protected] 120Hz, while also settings the in the game settings to 2k @ 120Hz?
    I hope this makes sense to someone and they can help with this :D
    Can't you just install fraps or a similar program and see the fps?
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • MushroomiesMushroomies Posts: 200
    Nexus 6
    There is a free VR Benchmark at Steam, It can tell you how you are doing in VR, Just thought I would say something about this, It would show you what FPS you have with current settings and equipment
  • RedRizlaRedRizla Posts: 7,387 Valuable Player
    RuneSR2 said:
    RedRizla said:
    I have a 4k Samsung television that is capable of running 2k at 120 Hz and 4k @ 60 Hz. On my Nvidia control panel I have the resolution set to 4k @ 60Hz. Now for the question. If I leave the Nvidia control panel set at 4k 60Hz and just set the in games setting to 2k resolution, then will I still get the [email protected] 120 Hz, or will it be 2k @ 60Hz? Or do I also have to set the desktop resolution in the Nvidia control Panel to [email protected] 120Hz, while also settings the in the game settings to 2k @ 120Hz?
    I hope this makes sense to someone and they can help with this :D
    Can't you just install fraps or a similar program and see the fps?

    I just need to know if it's running at 120Hz and a FPS program won't show me that, will it? When I game on a 60 Hz monitor it still shows well over 60 FPS.
  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 5,905 Valuable Player
    RedRizla said:
    RuneSR2 said:
    RedRizla said:
    I have a 4k Samsung television that is capable of running 2k at 120 Hz and 4k @ 60 Hz. On my Nvidia control panel I have the resolution set to 4k @ 60Hz. Now for the question. If I leave the Nvidia control panel set at 4k 60Hz and just set the in games setting to 2k resolution, then will I still get the [email protected] 120 Hz, or will it be 2k @ 60Hz? Or do I also have to set the desktop resolution in the Nvidia control Panel to [email protected] 120Hz, while also settings the in the game settings to 2k @ 120Hz?
    I hope this makes sense to someone and they can help with this :D
    Can't you just install fraps or a similar program and see the fps?

    I just need to know if it's running at 120Hz and a FPS program won't show me that, will it? When I game on a 60 Hz monitor it still shows well over 60 FPS.

    If you have vsync enabled and Fraps shows solid 120 (never above nor below) - then it's 120 Hz. If you don't activate vsync you could get Fraps to measure like 400 fps in some simple game - but you'll get no more than 60 of those shown with a 60 Hz screen - just remember to activate vsync (that will also provide best image quality with no screen tearing). 

    Btw, of course you could get 60 fps x 2 in 120 Hz (or 40 fps x 3 etc) if the game is demanding, so be sure to test using a game or app which your rig can achieve 120 fps - but with your 2080 Ti that should not be a problem :)
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
  • RedRizlaRedRizla Posts: 7,387 Valuable Player
    RuneSR2 said:
    RedRizla said:
    RuneSR2 said:
    RedRizla said:
    I have a 4k Samsung television that is capable of running 2k at 120 Hz and 4k @ 60 Hz. On my Nvidia control panel I have the resolution set to 4k @ 60Hz. Now for the question. If I leave the Nvidia control panel set at 4k 60Hz and just set the in games setting to 2k resolution, then will I still get the [email protected] 120 Hz, or will it be 2k @ 60Hz? Or do I also have to set the desktop resolution in the Nvidia control Panel to [email protected] 120Hz, while also settings the in the game settings to 2k @ 120Hz?
    I hope this makes sense to someone and they can help with this :D
    Can't you just install fraps or a similar program and see the fps?

    I just need to know if it's running at 120Hz and a FPS program won't show me that, will it? When I game on a 60 Hz monitor it still shows well over 60 FPS.

    If you have vsync enabled and Fraps shows solid 120 (never above nor below) - then it's 120 Hz. If you don't activate vsync you could get Fraps to measure like 400 fps in some simple game - but you'll get no more than 60 of those shown with a 60 Hz screen - just remember to activate vsync (that will also provide best image quality with no screen tearing). 

    Btw, of course you could get 60 fps x 2 in 120 Hz (or 40 fps x 3 etc) if the game is demanding, so be sure to test using a game or app which your rig can achieve 120 fps - but with your 2080 Ti that should not be a problem :)
    Do I activate Vsync both in the Nvidia Control Panel and in the games settings?

  • RuneSR2RuneSR2 Posts: 5,905 Valuable Player
    RedRizla said:
    RuneSR2 said:
    RedRizla said:
    RuneSR2 said:
    RedRizla said:
    I have a 4k Samsung television that is capable of running 2k at 120 Hz and 4k @ 60 Hz. On my Nvidia control panel I have the resolution set to 4k @ 60Hz. Now for the question. If I leave the Nvidia control panel set at 4k 60Hz and just set the in games setting to 2k resolution, then will I still get the [email protected] 120 Hz, or will it be 2k @ 60Hz? Or do I also have to set the desktop resolution in the Nvidia control Panel to [email protected] 120Hz, while also settings the in the game settings to 2k @ 120Hz?
    I hope this makes sense to someone and they can help with this :D
    Can't you just install fraps or a similar program and see the fps?

    I just need to know if it's running at 120Hz and a FPS program won't show me that, will it? When I game on a 60 Hz monitor it still shows well over 60 FPS.

    If you have vsync enabled and Fraps shows solid 120 (never above nor below) - then it's 120 Hz. If you don't activate vsync you could get Fraps to measure like 400 fps in some simple game - but you'll get no more than 60 of those shown with a 60 Hz screen - just remember to activate vsync (that will also provide best image quality with no screen tearing). 

    Btw, of course you could get 60 fps x 2 in 120 Hz (or 40 fps x 3 etc) if the game is demanding, so be sure to test using a game or app which your rig can achieve 120 fps - but with your 2080 Ti that should not be a problem :)
    Do I activate Vsync both in the Nvidia Control Panel and in the games settings?

    You can probably do both - but I think the Nvidia Control Panel setting overrules all in-game settings. 
    Intel i7 7700K (4.5 GHz); MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Gaming X (oc 2100 MHz gpu boost, 11 GHz mem speed); 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz; MSI Z270I Gaming Pro Carbon AC (VR-Ready) mainboard; Samsung 960 Evo M.2 SSD + Toshiba P300 HD; Windows 10 OS; Valve Index and Oculus Rift CV1 - the latter nearly always using super sampling 2.0. 

    "Ask not what VR can do for you – ask what you can do for VR"
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