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IPD Accuracy Question - Optician or Oculus?

caforisscaforiss Posts: 19
edited July 2013 in General
Just a quick question about IPD accuracy, maybe some one here know the answer.

Just wondering about the accuracy of the IPD measurement tool in Oculus' latest SDK build.
The reason I'm asking is my prescription for my glasses says i have a 64mm IPD, but the configuration tool in the software measured it to be 61.75mm (after many attempts, same result). Just wondering how their config tool stacks up against physical measurement. Which should I use or should I just split the difference (no noticeable difference using either in game. Was actually hoping for a headache from one or the other to make the choice obvious)

ps to Oculus: Like the new update but why don't you just black the left or right screen, as necessary, in the IPD measurement tool when asking the user to try and place the green line on the edge of the screen? Might make it a bit more comfortable for the user, so they don't have to try and close one eye and look all the way to the side. Just a thought.
Not sure if its Virtual Reality or Actual Fantasy?

Comments

  • 360FOV360FOV Posts: 476
    Hiro Protagonist
    I actully got exact same measurement when using a ruler and the Oculus tool. (66.7 and 67 mm)

    I think the best way to get an accurate IPD measurement is while in the Tuscany demo press the space bar then use the plus and minus keys to adjust the view until your eyes are still comfortable and you are getting the best 3d effect you can. If your IPD is too low then the 3d goes really weak. I think it is better to error on the slightly high side and be safe. Of course if you find it is causing eye strain then you can always take it down a little.
    “My ally is the Force. Life creates it, makes it grow. It’s energy surrounds us and binds us. Luminous beings are we…not this crude matter. You must feel the Force around you. Here, between you, me, the tree, the rock…everywhere!"
  • 360FOV wrote:
    I actually got exact same measurement when using a ruler and the Oculus tool. (66.7 and 67 mm)
    TF2 put me as ~43. The Oculus Tool put me as 69.1. I didn't know which one was correct, so I did exactly what 360FOV suggested. I got a (cloth) ruler and measured the distance between my pupils. The Oculus tool was dead accurate.
  • jwilkinsjwilkins Posts: 580
    Art3mis
    TF2 put me as ~43. The Oculus Tool put me as 69.1. I didn't know which one was correct, so I did exactly what 360FOV suggested. I got a (cloth) ruler and measured the distance between my pupils. The Oculus tool was dead accurate.

    I really doubt 43mm would be correct unless you are a child. That would put you well into the 1st percentile (and probably the first percentile of the first percentile!). What I mean is, 1 in 100 men have an ipd less than 57mm.

    I concur with the need to blank out the unused eye while configuring. An optometrist would cover your eye for you, or ask you to cover your eye, instead of asking you to strain and squint to keep one eye closed (which probably messes up certain measurements now that I think about it).

    I've done an experiment where I've drawn a single pixel in one eye and I cannot even guess which eye it is in! Similar thing happens with the mouse cursor when you view the desktop through the Rift. I bet the IPD tool could be written so that you don't even notice that only one eye can see whatever it is you need to look at.
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  • jkflipflopjkflipflop Posts: 46
    jwilkins wrote:
    TF2 put me as ~43. The Oculus Tool put me as 69.1. I didn't know which one was correct, so I did exactly what 360FOV suggested. I got a (cloth) ruler and measured the distance between my pupils. The Oculus tool was dead accurate.

    I really doubt 43mm would be correct unless you are a child. That would put you well into the 1st percentile (and probably the first percentile of the first percentile!). What I mean is, 1 in 100 men have an ipd less than 57mm.

    I concur with the need to blank out the unused eye while configuring. An optometrist would cover your eye for you, or ask you to cover your eye, instead of asking you to strain and squint to keep one eye closed (which probably messes up certain measurements now that I think about it).

    I've done an experiment where I've drawn a single pixel in one eye and I cannot even guess which eye it is in! Similar thing happens with the mouse cursor when you view the desktop through the Rift. I bet the IPD tool could be written so that you don't even notice that only one eye can see whatever it is you need to look at.

    Isn't it that way now? I leave both eyes open when doing the test. The line still only shows up in one eye it needs to anyways.
  • jwilkinsjwilkins Posts: 580
    Art3mis
    jkflipflop wrote:
    Isn't it that way now? I leave both eyes open when doing the test. The line still only shows up in one eye it needs to anyways.

    You haven't provided me with enough context to answer your question.
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  • jwilkins wrote:
    jkflipflop wrote:
    Isn't it that way now? I leave both eyes open when doing the test. The line still only shows up in one eye it needs to anyways.
    You haven't provided me with enough context to answer your question.
    I think I can reword his question for you:

    During a test of one eye, although blanking the other eye may be ideal, what does it really matter if you close your other eye or not? There isn't anything in the opposite eye that is really going to confuse him.
  • jkflipflopjkflipflop Posts: 46
    jwilkins wrote:
    jkflipflop wrote:
    Isn't it that way now? I leave both eyes open when doing the test. The line still only shows up in one eye it needs to anyways.
    You haven't provided me with enough context to answer your question.
    I think I can reword his question for you:

    During a test of one eye, although blanking the other eye may be ideal, what does it really matter if you close your other eye or not? There isn't anything in the opposite eye that is really going to confuse him.

    Exactly. You already have your other eye blanked out.
  • jwilkinsjwilkins Posts: 580
    Art3mis
    jwilkins wrote:
    jkflipflop wrote:
    Isn't it that way now? I leave both eyes open when doing the test. The line still only shows up in one eye it needs to anyways.
    You haven't provided me with enough context to answer your question.
    I think I can reword his question for you:

    During a test of one eye, although blanking the other eye may be ideal, what does it really matter if you close your other eye or not? There isn't anything in the opposite eye that is really going to confuse him.

    From my understanding users were being asked to close their eyes. I'm saying users should not have to close their eyes because if you put something that only one eye can see, then there shouldn't be a problem. If this is how things already are then I'm not sure what people are complaining about.

    This is how I see it:

    1) People have complained that closing one eye can be difficult for them to actually do. (just take their word for it)
    2) Squinting may actually affect the measurement that is being made.
    3) Covering one eye is what often optometrists do.
    4) It is an extra step and instruction that could be left out entirely.
    5) Your brain may not even be able to tell that only one eye can see something.

    As for any confusion, I'm wouldn't be so quick to assume that any particular stimulus is confusing or not. A blank screen is probably the safest bet because it doesn't give the brain anything to work with from the eye that isn't being tested. Like I stated before, with stimulus from two eyes, it can be impossible to even tell which eye is seeing what.
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