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Oculus Rift will change tourism industry

photographerphotographer Posts: 89
edited November 2015 in General
I have always dreamed about traveling, its my main passion along with photography. With oculus rift there will be content that that will allow me to virtually travel anywhere I want and with something like omni treadmill or any threadmill and motion detection I could actually walk in the plains of Serengeti or even Antarctica - in the footsteps of the guy or girl who has the camera attached to them or the robot etc.

I could go for a run in the morning in some exotic beach and in the evening stroll the streets of some city. I could hang out with a wolf pack or climb Everest with an expedition. I could be a virtual storm chaser close to a tornado and even travel deep in the ocean.

In fact these experiences will be so real, without risk, and of course cheap that I might actually have second thoughts about traveling... Antarctica without the cold... Jungles without the heat and bugs... And people who will provide these content will make millions.

While OR is a gaming device it has so much potential that its beyond comprehension as of now. Once the 'collective consciousness' is made aware of this little device and its available in shops, there will be an explosion of creativity that might actually change the world itself - no exaggeration intended, use your own imagination.

In the R&D offices of all major electronic companies, they're right now scratching their heads on how to make their own ORs and join this new VR revolution... In fact other uses of OR might in fact overshadow its humble gaming origins.

Comments

  • VinVin Posts: 874
    Brain Burst
    VR can't replace the actual reality of doing something or being somewhere. It makes for an awesome gaming experience, but if you really wanted to go to Spain and try the food, you will never be able to with VR.
  • Vin wrote:
    VR can't replace the actual reality of doing something or being somewhere. It makes for an awesome gaming experience, but if you really wanted to go to Spain and try the food, you will never be able to with VR.

    Here is a small test of whats to come, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D47MAQ9U6qE

    This is some dude with two gopros in stereo casing in his local park. Now just imagine the potential.

    Real travel is of course "real", but personally, I want to "travel" every evening for an hour or so after dinner. I want to travel to places without putting up with all the crap that comes with real travel...
  • VinVin Posts: 874
    Brain Burst
    The problem with things like that video is that it breaks several rules of designing a great VR experience. Since the headtracking doesn't exist for the viewer, and since the motions are controlled by a third party, it leaves plenty of room for people to get sick, as is clearly happening in the comments.

    As for strapping some cameras on your quadcopter and flying around using your own headtracking, I'm all for that. But a playback experience won't lend itself towards full immersion. Since there's no way to record 360 degree 3D footage, there's not going to be a way to record real places for a proper VR experience for others. Replicated landscapes will be the way to go, for sure.

    Going to a 3D replication of Mount Rushmore after dinner might be a fun way to spend a few minutes, but won't have an impact on actual tourism.
  • Vin wrote:
    The problem with things like that video is that it breaks several rules of designing a great VR experience. Since the headtracking doesn't exist for the viewer, and since the motions are controlled by a third party, it leaves plenty of room for people to get sick, as is clearly happening in the comments.

    As for strapping some cameras on your quadcopter and flying around using your own headtracking, I'm all for that. But a playback experience won't lend itself towards full immersion. Since there's no way to record 360 degree 3D footage, there's not going to be a way to record real places for a proper VR experience for others. Replicated landscapes will be the way to go, for sure.

    Going to a 3D replication of Mount Rushmore after dinner might be a fun way to spend a few minutes, but won't have an impact on actual tourism.

    In case an environment is photographed in 360 degrees and then optimized for viewing with something like OR, then head tracking and all of that will work. This is where the new content comes to play.

    But then even seeing the POV of someone else in OR is sufficient. For instance Travel documentaries will be from the POV of the host or someone else who travels along with the host and that is you the viewer - personalized entertainment.

    While enjoying games with OR might not be for everyone, video with OR can be enjoyed by everyone. One small example, a virtual cinema, where one can go and watch a movie with other real people but in a virtual space.
  • dbuckdbuck Posts: 104
    Hiro Protagonist
    You don't even really need to get to completely 360, just noticeably wider than the rift fov.. (which is good, because that starts to get expensive quick.) it would clearly be awesome, but I think there is plenty of room with something like a double 180 fisheye with some post de-fishing, or some faux projection mapping a-la: Dave did a good example also: http://www.garagegames.com/community/blogs/view/22255 albeit without any depth since it's essentially focus @ infinty for something like that.

    there's quite a few discussions about this going already
  • Hi guys, what do you think in how far can the oculus rift influence tourism in terms of marketing, educational tourism and recreational tourism?
  • Tourism industry being replaced by VR in the 2040s is mentioned in futuretimeline by the way:

    http://www.futuretimeline.net/21stcentury/2039.htm

    I don't think the rift can replace Tourism in its current form, however, it can be a useful educational tool so that people can relive history instead of just reading it on books/the internet. Also, most people go on vacations to relax and do a variety of activities, going sightseeing is just a part of that and not the cause of the trip ;)
  • alejuxalejux Posts: 171
    Brain Burst
    Very unlikely the Rift, or any other near future VR device will influence tourism. I can see many business trips being replaced by virtual-reality/telepresence meetings some time in the next decade, once we have full resolution display and near perfect body and facial motion capture. But for actual tourism, I think only when the more immersive technologies start to appear, and when that happens reality will start losing it's attraction IMO. A lot of the lure of sightseeing would lose it's appeal when you could see much more awe-inspiring sights created in virtual worlds.
  • VinVin Posts: 874
    Brain Burst
    alejux wrote:
    Very unlikely the Rift, or any other near future VR device will influence tourism. I can see many business trips being replaced by virtual-reality/telepresence meetings some time in the next decade, once we have full resolution display and near perfect body and facial motion capture. But for actual tourism, I think only when the more immersive technologies start to appear, and when that happens reality will start losing it's attraction IMO. A lot of the lure of sightseeing would lose it's appeal when you could see much more awe-inspiring sights created in virtual worlds.

    A lot of companies use telepresence for meetings already, especially in large software companies where teams of developers need to collaborate across multiple offices, states, and even countries. While it does provide some benefits, I've not seen a place that relies only on telepresence. These places augment it with somewhat frequent get togethers, where all the developers are brought together for face time with each other, so many business trips will still occur. Nothing beats taking someone you only communicate with electronically out to the bar for a few beers to really get to know each other.
  • alejuxalejux Posts: 171
    Brain Burst
    Vin wrote:
    alejux wrote:
    Very unlikely the Rift, or any other near future VR device will influence tourism. I can see many business trips being replaced by virtual-reality/telepresence meetings some time in the next decade, once we have full resolution display and near perfect body and facial motion capture. But for actual tourism, I think only when the more immersive technologies start to appear, and when that happens reality will start losing it's attraction IMO. A lot of the lure of sightseeing would lose it's appeal when you could see much more awe-inspiring sights created in virtual worlds.

    A lot of companies use telepresence for meetings already, especially in large software companies where teams of developers need to collaborate across multiple offices, states, and even countries. While it does provide some benefits, I've not seen a place that relies only on telepresence. These places augment it with somewhat frequent get togethers, where all the developers are brought together for face time with each other, so many business trips will still occur. Nothing beats taking someone you only communicate with electronically out to the bar for a few beers to really get to know each other.


    But that's where the power of virtual reality comes in. It will allow communication in a level very similar to a personal one, where we will be able to look people in the eye, see their expressions, whisper in someones ear or shout across the room; pass along a document or look over someones shoulder while they look at a display, and even have a meeting in a virtual bar (or strip-club).

    I'm talking about a much more immersive and cheaper technology then the one that exists today. It will certainly be possible in the next decade, and it will transform workplaces.
  • VinVin Posts: 874
    Brain Burst
    Some of the haptics challenges required to be solved to create the same experience as going out on the town with a co-worker will not be solved in the next ten years, and when they are finally solved, will not be cheap.
  • alejuxalejux Posts: 171
    Brain Burst
    Vin wrote:
    Some of the haptics challenges required to be solved to create the same experience as going out on the town with a co-worker will not be solved in the next ten years, and when they are finally solved, will not be cheap.

    Going out of town with a co-worker is not exactly what I was referring to. :P

    A basic haptics glove would be more than sufficient for work interaction, such as passing documents, touching virtual screens and keyboards, etc... And those are likely to be cheap in a decade.

    If all that is taken care of, I seriously doubt many companies will be willing to pay travel expenses so co-workers can go to town.
  • VinVin Posts: 874
    Brain Burst
    alejux wrote:
    If all that is taken care of, I seriously doubt many companies will be willing to pay travel expenses so co-workers can go to town.

    When you have a team of software developers in the United States, a team in Ireland, and a team in Germany, it will always be best to ensure that they get to spend real time with each other so that they don't form this "us" vs "them" mentality, especially when they're all working on the same product or product line. The cost of a few plane tickets and a hotel is massively worth the benefit you get in the teams working together properly. This is just one of many types of benefits you get with allowing people to meet in meatspace as opposed to strictly through Google Hangouts (or Oculus Hangouts as we might be discussing) especially when the cost of all the VR technology and training required to approximate certain types of interactions is extremely high.

    Meatspace will continue to hold many advantages to VR for a few decades at the least.
  • alejuxalejux Posts: 171
    Brain Burst
    Vin wrote:
    alejux wrote:
    If all that is taken care of, I seriously doubt many companies will be willing to pay travel expenses so co-workers can go to town.

    When you have a team of software developers in the United States, a team in Ireland, and a team in Germany, it will always be best to ensure that they get to spend real time with each other so that they don't form this "us" vs "them" mentality, especially when they're all working on the same product or product line. The cost of a few plane tickets and a hotel is massively worth the benefit you get in the teams working together properly. This is just one of many types of benefits you get with allowing people to meet in meatspace as opposed to strictly through Google Hangouts (or Oculus Hangouts as we might be discussing) especially when the cost of all the VR technology and training required to approximate certain types of interactions is extremely high.

    Meatspace will continue to hold many advantages to VR for a few decades at the least.


    I work in software development with people from different places in the US, Brazil , India and Sri Lanka. Very rarely one manager or developer needs to travel as a requirement for a project. Usually only to meet clients. Even then, most of the communication with clients is done remotely, through g2m , skype, email or phone. And even with this very crappy form of communication, many bonds are formed between project team mates.

    I seriously doubt, that given presence of a good virtual reality communication (realistic avatars, realistic body/hand/facial motion capture, binaural audio and hand haptics), that we would increase productivity if some of us were to travel thousands of miles, spend thousands of dollars in plane tickets and hotels, just to look at each other in real life (something that we would already imitate daily through VR).

    I'm not saying that by next decade VR will be better then human contact. It won't. But it will be good enough for a lot of the business meetings and working environments.

    Also, how good it will be, will depend of the quality of the technology, the sense of immersion and how much you will feel that you're actually next to a person. It's not something that will either be bad or good. It will evolve gradually. The reason I mentioned next decade, if because I don't see this technology being good enough or cheap enough before 2025. There are too many obstacles, such as realistic human rendering, facial motion capture (using a HMD), realistic 3D audio, decent and cheap haptic gloves, etc...
  • NewtNewt Posts: 8
    Im an avid gamer but oddly enough Im far more exited about the potential of VR visual experiences rather then interactive games.

    If the technology existed I would gladly pay to view events and places all over the world where the cost of travel is prohibitive, non practical or simply dangerous. If there was a static camera that would capture 360 3D video that I can view in my VR device In real time I would watch all kinds of live shows across the world. Theater, ballet, concerts or whatever visual live shows. I would watch space shuttle launches, wildlife cameras, the northern lights, or whatever place something interesting happens and you could install a camera.

    This will in no way replace the traveling and tourism I do today but rather give immersive access to places I would never get to before.
  • silentdriversilentdriver Posts: 15
    NerveGear
    anybody tried out that london-experience vr thingee done in unity?
    although it's simply true that a vr-experience can never live up "being there in real life" it's still a very charming experience to be there in vr. seeing/being at places I know from former trips but where I can only go to from time to time.

    Link to that London experience thingee:
    http://www.riftenabled.com/admin/app/3161
  • VinVin Posts: 874
    Brain Burst
    alejux wrote:
    I work in software development with people from different places in the US, Brazil , India and Sri Lanka. Very rarely one manager or developer needs to travel as a requirement for a project. Usually only to meet clients. Even then, most of the communication with clients is done remotely, through g2m , skype, email or phone. And even with this very crappy form of communication, many bonds are formed between project team mates.

    This is a bit of a rare thing. Of all the companies I've worked at, only the smallest didn't take some time time for face to face interactions, and I can tell your company won't be one of those small guys due to the distribution. Hell, even Valve flies everyone to Hawaii.
  • MannyLectroMannyLectro Posts: 558
    Hiro Protagonist
    Hey guys !

    I'm very glad to see so much interested in the idea of virtual tourism.

    It's really really interesting to see all the problems you are seeing in a proper VR tele-presence.

    Ok... I have to admit that a friend and I are working very hard on something that might solve all these problems. We have a very good idea, a "almost" working prototype and some contacts with a lab to make things go a step further.

    Our technology would allow anyone to be virtually projected in a real environment.

    We are scared of talking about it yet because we don't want some people with more means to steal it from us.
    But we are also scared to wait too much and see someone else do it instead of us...

    So... Quite lost right now :( ! I hope I'll have more to show in the coming weeks.
    Rift 3d models available here : viewtopic.php?t=1514
    321d7a56-bfc9-4667-85ce-3a67291aa90a.jpg
  • dawgs4everdawgs4ever Posts: 82
    Brain Burst
    If nothing else, the OR in the near term (within the next 10 years) may create new value for the tourism industry by giving people "tutorials" or "walkthroughs" of areas they plan to travel to. While it would be hard to imagine a VR "trip" to Spain imitating that experience in the near future, I very well might buy a software package that allowed me to do a google maps sort of adventure of Spain to identify the areas I want to visit. Or an interactive walkthrough of Spain that showed all of the restaurants or tourist attractions and allowed me to tour them via VR and help me plan out my vacation. Same thing with visiting hotels in the area and seeing where they are located relative to the areas I hope to visit.

    So VR may enhance and offer an additional product in the tourism industry in the short term.
  • drashdrash Posts: 2,849
    Neo
    I usually think about tourists as divided into two groups:

    1) Those that don't want to know too much about a destination beforehand so that they can go in with no/low expectations and be surprised, etc. They will avoid "spoilers" ahead of the trip like pictures, travel guides, Street View, VR replicas, etc.

    2) Those that want to know as much as possible about a destination in order to make an informed choice of how to make the best use of time there. I can see VR replicas helping out a lot for these people!

    I'm personally a #1, and I'm always compelled to let someone else work out travel details so that I can be surprised along the way. However, it always backfires when I later learn something that would have helped me further appreciate what I saw on a trip. :(
  • hannukohannuko Posts: 11
    Hi!

    I would like to bring this discussion back to live.. If this gets enought support, it will be possible sooner than you think:

    http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/oculus-rift-telepresence-module
  • A439A439 Posts: 3
    It might be that the Oculus Rift will positively chance tourism industry, but also the logistic or game sector. I've worked for 3 years for a german company. They had made considerable progress during the years and presented 2015 their material flow planning software with virtual-reality-techniques for the first time. They see a great potential for this business.
    David
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