New to the forums? Click here to read the "How To" Guide.

Developer? Click here to go to the Developer Forums.

nausea thread - how do i get used to the rift?

1235

Comments

  • RoasterRoaster Posts: 1,053
    3Jane
    Very strange indeed. I'm 60 and never had any sim sickness for a month now. I was in the Navy for 8 years and only got sea sick once. One really strange episode occurred when I first went wind surfing. Stayed out most of the day learning and had a blast, and woke up the next day sick as a dog and spent the day extremely dizzy and puking.
    Have you tried that stuff you dissolve under your tongue to prevent it? Zentrip. I would do whatever it takes to survive, as motion sickness is terible.
    i7-5820K @ 4.2Ghz, water cooled, Asus X99-Pro USB 3.1, 48 Gb DDR4 2400, Samsung 950 pro M.2 SSD, GTX 980 Ti SC, 750w psu
  • bud01bud01 Posts: 169
    Hiro Protagonist
    I will tell you how you could get rid of this problem from a manufacture vendor point of view.

    But it would involve a lot of testing and would also invovle equipment not easily available (there was a national security order slapped on patanted digital version) and could also not be put in with the Oculus with out infringement of patent ?

    But the up side is that you would be able to replicate any motion required to tie with the visual presentation in front of the viewer.

    Example if you run straight ahead and stop that is a forward motion and a sudden stop measured by way of what, by the brushing of hairs in the cochlea.

    There is a little bead in there that helps with balance and motion, and also not widely known sound.

    To find out how to stop motion sickness in virtual reality you have to look at the work of dr patrick flanagan.

    Through his product the nurophone (most of the cool info on this has been removed from the internet it looks like to me, there was a lot more and the dsp product available for purchase as well) you can present audio information to the mind of completely deaf people (people with out even ear drums etc or bone conduction possible).

    Not many people know that, all of the deaf people in the world dont have to be through the nurophone.

    He found that the same means of audio transferance as dolphins (up at that freq) could be made via his Nurophone product and VIA the human nevious system, that is pads from a nurophone transmitted information to the Cochlea and the small bead in there which does not only deal with movement but sound. Also the opposite is possible, digital encodement of non audable sound (above 20k) could be used to present some semblance of motion.

    The way you resolve the motion sickness issue is you have to take control of that bead and encode into it via digital signal


    His story is actually quite interesting, he is one of those child genus people, he invented anti rocket defence systems as a child which the army purchased from him, regarding the nurophone its orginal anaglog patant was NOT granted and refused and he is the only person in the history of the American patant office to have the decision overturned. There was a completely deaf women that worked at the patant office and he said ok so If i can make this women hear then you will grant me the patant... he hooked his unit up to a record player and played some opera or classical music and she heard it (started crying).

    You need to digitally take control of the cochlea but you will be stepping into patants, I dont know now but they were removed from public domain for national security reasons once flanagan went from angalog to digital.

    If I was at Oculus I would try to get a hold of dr patrick flanagan and give him the problem and ask him what he knows about this area.

    You wanted to know how to fix this issue, I would start there.


    http://i41.tinypic.com/29opp9j.jpg
    http://i41.tinypic.com/10n9r0l.png
  • usb420usb420 Posts: 291
    I cant move in vr without feeling like I'm gonna puke.
    it helps if you walk in place but that's not exactly convenient for most games.
  • vonFeltyvonFelty Posts: 121
    Personally, I practiced getting used to VR by sitting "Blocked In" for 20 minutes at a time. Since you are sitting in place looking at an awesome looking room you don't get motion sick. Playing Minecraft made me a bit queasy, but I drank a bunch of beer and it seemed to help. Now its less of a problem even when sober. I just have to not move in super fast motions. Not that I am suggesting you get drunk and play on the Rift, but it helped me somewhat.
  • So...here's my update after 9 days with the Rift.
    I think I made it through the VR sickness!... but not with positional tracking :cry:
    The first few days were really rough, I was depressed and thought that I was going to be one of those unfortunate souls that can't do VR. I was getting nauseous even thinking about going near a computer. I was useless at work (editing on a computer for 9 hours). I felt like VR had broken my brain IRL. Even though I was taking Ginger pills, going slow with BlockedIn, Lunar flight, Blue Marble, Titans, I still felt really nauseous for the first 3 days. I blame it all on doing too much on my first day. I felt fine after hours plowing through every demo, but Half Life VR mod with positional tracking was like the big present under the christmas tree. So at the end of the first night I finally got it set up and I dove into City 17. The positional tracking is amazing, but the lag is what I think really messes me up. So I took a break from the positional tracking.
    I've been fine all week, I've been playing hours and hours of Lunar Flight (it really is awesome, I play it with the audio from the Apollo missions streaming through NASA's website). I've played every demo I can get my hands on, I can zoom around a VR world with the Xbox controller, with no problem, strafing, spinning, backwards at 50mph in Windlands, I can drop from heights and it's exhilarating instead of upsetting. I was cured!
    ... But today I tried Hydradeck Humans, Hydradeck Cover Shooter, Crashland, Buck's Hydra experiment, and Titans of space with Hydra positional tracking. And it has me feeling "drifty" again.
    I don't feel sick, but I just feel like everything IRL is slowly waving back and forth. It's like your brain starts to think that the reaction of visual input in the VR world from the hydra positional tracking is what the world should be doing, and then when you pull out of that VR world, your sense of balance is off.
    And it's only after I come out of VR that I start feeling weird. While I'm in the Rift with positional tracking, I feel fine, it's really immersive, even though it feels like drunk vision, I feel like I adapt to it pretty quickly.
    Don't get me wrong, the positional tracking is amazing, and big props and a thousand thank-yous to WormSlayer, Nathan Andrews and Teddy for the work they've done with hydra support. It gets me really excited for the consumer version with it's perfected tracking, and the STEM system. In the meantime, while I wait, I will definitely try to keep with it to see if I can get used to it.

    The hydras are worth their weight in gold right now just for the fact they can give you well tracked hands/guns/gravity guns/grenades and lightsabers. The positional tracking is more of a proof of concept at the moment.
    So, all of that being said, I would caution new Rifters to really take their time with hydra positional tracking, I know it's torture to have the hydras and not jump in using them for positional tracking right away, just be patient. You've waited this long to jack in, take your time, we'll get there. :)
  • I still get that funky nausea feeling after playing any FPS style game with the Rift, so I limit myself to around 20 min. Now where I don't feel any nausea at all when I use the Rift is when I'm in my SimPit I built for racing games. I can play iRacing for hours. Being stationary in the seat with the wheel and pedal setup. It's just so immersive I don't get any feeling other than Hey! I'm driving a race car around a track and im going really really fast lol. Heck in the 49 Lotus, I can look over my shoulder and see the motor just inches from me its CRAZY!

    Over time I hope to get use to Rifting with all sorts of games but for now i'll stick with racing sims..
  • morenosubamorenosuba Posts: 135
    Art3mis
    i've had the OR now for about 3 weeks.
    started with 15-20 minutes every other day. progressed to about 1 or 2 hours (mostly Hawken as it was the most agreeable for me).
    2 days ago Vireio came out with their 2.0 and after tweaking Skyrim a bit i've now been able to do 4/5 hour sessions without any problems. Today i did two 5 hour sessions in a row with a 2 hour interval in between and i'm feeling great. That's 10 hours of amazing Skyrim VR with not a hint of nausea. Sure there is little eye strain, but mostly because shadows and menus in Skyrim are still very screwy.

    I completely believe that the sickness is a combination of the low resolution of the dev kit + unoptimized games/VR software. As these VR compatibility programs get more and more refined the experience improves 10 folds.

    By the way i still can't play TF2 for more than 10 minutes without wanting to barf. i don't know if it's the speed or close quarters in that game but it just doesn't agree with me.
  • Yeah its just moving that makes me feel ill. About a second after moving I get that weird sort of pulling feeling while my brain gets confused that my body is still physically still.

    Most games move too fast imo. Even the Tuscany demo made me feel like I was being thrown about.
    Order no.: 0899XX
    Order confirmation: 15th November 2013 (NZDT)
    Processing: 27th November 2013
    Shipping: 30th November 2013
    Arrived: 2nd December 2013
  • bob123bob123 Posts: 43
    Real quick!

    i got my oculus last week monday tried it and freeking loved it! untill 15 min after i got really sick.. so sick i had to lay down for an hour.. i felt down cause ive been waiting for this device since Johnny Mnemonic(1995)!!

    yesterday i played 1 and a half hour of half life 2 without any sickness whatsoever. Ive been busting robocop moves with the hydra shooting under my left arm and over the shoulders while looking back just hilarious!

    My brain got used to it.. dont know what the chemistry is behind all this but im guessing your brain just needs time to adapt to the vr world.
  • 2 week update

    For those of you who are just getting your rifts and maybe want a little reassurance about the vr sickness. Or those of you who just bought your rift and are now just obsessing over every post.

    I think I'm over it! wooohhoooooo! It was really bad for me at first, but now, 2 weeks later I don't get sick at all any more.

    I can play half life 2 with the hydra mod (the only way!) for 3-4 hours + with no problem. On the contrary, it's exhilirating, I can't put it down, and I've played through this game at least 10 times since it came out, and I'm playing it like it's brand new. The Hydra (not positional) tracking is amazing, and I really feel like I'm in the game. Currently in Ravenholm...

    I've played Lunar Flight for 4-5 hour stretches, I've swung from trees in Windlands, I've done barrel rolls in First Law. In the first few days I could barely walk forward for more than a few seconds. I can report that I think that I'm over the sickness. But man, I still get vertigo when I'm standing looking over a cliff or a bridge, but that's just my brain doing it's job. Also, I would still warn people that the hydra positional tracking is playing with fire, just take it slow. I want to love hydra positional tracking, but it doesn't make me feel good. hopefully the STEM will be the perfect solution.

    If you are feeling sick and depressed that vr is not for you after getting your rift, just give it time. If nothing else the consumer version should solve it for you. Alright, I'll stop making updates for people who don't give a...
  • AnticlericAnticleric Posts: 525 Oculus Start Member
    1 week in. Can only handle a few mins. at a time in the Rift still.

    For me, 2 things really set me off.

    The first is any movement of my body. Simply leaning back in my chair from my starting position hit's me with an instant wave. It's like that shot they do in movies where the camera is pulling back and zooming in at the same time. My body instantly says "nope".

    Second is non-head based player movement. Worse with a game pad, but it happens with the mouse as well.

    Can't handle FPS type games at all in the Rift. Just tried "Among the Sleep", it's really cool , but as soon as I started walking, the intense nausea hit me like a ton of bricks. I managed to rescue my poor teddy bear from the washing machine before I had to remove the rift and read this entire thread. That was about 2 hours ago and I'm still feeling it.

    I do (rarely) get motion sick in the real world, in similar situations. Swinging on a swing set will do it, and being below deck on a moving boat (I used to race sailboats).

    It's not a frame rate issue at all (my machine is a beast), or IPD. I can sit and watch movies in VR Player indefinitely or hang out in blocked in.

    I can fight through it with some deep breathing exercises, but in the end, the longer I fight it, the longer it lasts when I come back to reality.

    It's strictly a movement vs vision thing. I'm hoping that the positional tracking will clear everything up.

    For the record, Marijuana doesn't help (it's cool, I'm Canadian). The only thing that seems to help is sleeping.
    I might speak to my doctor and see if I can try some pills in the meantime.
  • I made a schedule:

    Day 1: 15 mins every 2 1/2 hours
    Day 2: 15 mins every hour (if you have time of course)
    Day 3: 25 mins every 2 1/2 hours
    Day 4: 25 mins every hour (if you have time)
    Day 5: 30 to 50 mins every 3 hours
    Day 6: 30 to 50 mins every 2 hours
    Day 7: You should be able to do around 1 to 2 hours play session without nausea now.

    This is a homemade schedule so it may not work for some people. It worked for me atleast

    Happy rifting! ;)
  • JCatJCat Posts: 132
    Art3mis
    My Rift should be here within the next week or so, and this topic is my biggest concern. I can deal with the screen door and rez, but nausea is another story. I use to get super bad motion sickness when playing the original Doom, but today's FPS games luckily don't affect me that way. I've become an avid 3D fanatic over the years, and own a passive and active display. I usually go through phases where I don't bother with 3D, then become obsessive for weeks, trying out new content. Currently I'm playing with an IPS passive 3D display, and when I started up last week, I was a bit queasy after a half hour; now I'm able to play for much longer periods.

    My question is, when I get the rift, do you think I kind of have a head start in the nauseous department due to my current exposure to stereoscopic tech, or is this really a whole 'nother ball game? I guess this question is geared to those who come from a similar setup. Thanks for your input!
  • VRoomVRoom Posts: 596
    Nobody knows for sure. But all reports so far put VR sickness in "'nother ball game" courtyard.
    It doesn't matter if you are prone to car/boat/airplane/3d sickness or not.
  • Normally I have a very low motion sickness threshold. I can't read in a car, and a single rollercoaster ride puts me out of action for an entire day. So when I got the chance to borrow a Rift over a long weekend to play Half Life 2, I wasn't optimistic!

    I got it plugged in and set up, and launched Minecraft. Within seconds I could feel the first warning signs of motion sickness, so I quickly took the headset off before it passed the point of no return.

    Before trying again I took anti-motion-sickness tablets and waited the recommended couple of hours for them to take effect. The next time I tried, I could still feel the 'swimmy head' sense of disconnection, but it did not snowball into nausea. This allowed me to concentrate on optimising the control method for long-term comfort.

    The first thing I discovered was that although having a horizontal 'keyhole' for mouse aiming in Minecraft/HL2 felt really exciting and natural for aiming purposes, it massively augmented motion sickness. This was, I became convinced, because horizontal mouse movements would sometimes caused a FOV change and sometimes not, and with an unpredictable amount of lag (as the cursor moved within the slot before starting to turn the camera).

    The second thing I found was that aiming with the headset was also a big no-no. Not sure why; might be the constant effort of fine head movements to pick targets. Yuck.

    After much fiddling, I found the ideal setup for me:

    1. Vertical head tilt and vertical aiming completely decoupled and independent.

    Looking up/down doesn't change where I'm aiming, and aiming up/down doesn't change where I'm looking.

    2. Horizontal head turn doesn't aim, but aiming 'pushes' FoV.

    Looking left/right doesn't change where I'm aiming, but aiming left/right DOES change where I'm looking.

    This minimised any disorientation. Moving the mouse left and right ALWAYS turned 'me', with no sense of lag. Moving the mouse up and down NEVER moved my FoV, only the aiming cursor. I suspect this worked well because my brain was able to consistently 'map' horizontal mouse movement to my virtual body, and vertical mouse movement to my virtual arm.

    With this setup I was able to wean myself off the tablets over the next couple of days while playing HL2 for a good 4-6 hours each day.
  • I will make my own thread to discuss this because I have a good answer.
  • JCat wrote:
    My Rift should be here within the next week or so, and this topic is my biggest concern. I can deal with the screen door and rez, but nausea is another story. I use to get super bad motion sickness when playing the original Doom, but today's FPS games luckily don't affect me that way. I've become an avid 3D fanatic over the years, and own a passive and active display. I usually go through phases where I don't bother with 3D, then become obsessive for weeks, trying out new content. Currently I'm playing with an IPS passive 3D display, and when I started up last week, I was a bit queasy after a half hour; now I'm able to play for much longer periods.

    My question is, when I get the rift, do you think I kind of have a head start in the nauseous department due to my current exposure to stereoscopic tech, or is this really a whole 'nother ball game? I guess this question is geared to those who come from a similar setup. Thanks for your input!

    It might help that you're used to 3d gaming. But what you won't really understand until you strap it on, is that you really trick your brain into thinking you're there. No 3D monitor around really makes you feel like you are there. The 3D is much more pronounced and the ability to move your head to look is what separates it from a 3D display experience.
    On the other hand, what might give you a leg up is the fact that you are familiar with the simulator sickness sensation. You may already already have gained your VR legs and you don't even know it.
    My advice is the same as everyone else's:
    Start with simple demos (BlockedIn, Tuscany without moving or close your eyes when you move, VR cinema, Windlands without moving, Lunar Flight if you own it- watch the youtube tutorials, and Ginger Pills)
    Then once you've gotten past the "Holy crap I'm in VR, I've been waiting so long to jack in!" after that, give yourself the movement test. Try moving in Tuscany or VR Cinema, but really feather the acceleration and only turn with your head, not with the mouse or gamepad.
    Titans of Space is an amazing demo and many people say it is perfect for easing in to a VR experience. This is true on many levels, it has a great sense of depth, scale, and a general "wow factor" of presenting a surreal out of this world experience. But, the movement was a little intense for me the first time. By my second try, I was adjusted to it, but at first it was borderline problematic. Just remember, with Titans, you can slow down the speed of the movement with D-Pad Up and Down on an Xbox gamepad. The Blue bar above the word "Ready" will lengthen and shorten as you change it.
    Just remember, if you start to feel sick: Stop immediately! You can't push through it. And the more you try the longer it lasts in the real world.
    Finally, Don't be discouraged if this sensation sticks with you for a while. The next two days after my first experience I was severely messed up in the real world. I was feeling like I was falling over while standing, rooms were looking like they were on an incline, like everything should be sliding towards me. Very strange, I thought I broke my brain. But just have faith, your brain will adjust to the new experience.
  • Peeling wrote:
    Normally I have a very low motion sickness threshold. I can't read in a car, and a single rollercoaster ride puts me out of action for an entire day. So when I got the chance to borrow a Rift over a long weekend to play Half Life 2, I wasn't optimistic!
    .....
    The second thing I found was that aiming with the headset was also a big no-no. Not sure why; might be the constant effort of fine head movements to pick targets. Yuck.

    I tried the HL2 vr mod first with the Hydras and I sadly can't go back to gamepad/mouse gaming. It is the only way to shoot a gun in a game. Once I got around to trying the official HL version I was ruined, I couldn't handle the keyhole and the gamepad control was unusable. I know the Hydras are unobtainable right now, but I don't think that old input methods should even be in consideration. Although games like Lunar Flight are fine with the Xbox controller. FPS aim based games need a new paradigm though.
    As with your second comment about the headlook, I only have had a chance to try this with Time Rifters and I thought it works great.
    I can see what you mean with the fine movements though. I agree that's not the way to go. I don't know how you even could pick out a target small enough with DK1's resolution!
  • JCatJCat Posts: 132
    Art3mis
    @RedAndBlue -

    Thank you for your extensive reply. I'm prepping for the big day Monday, and will start off on the recommended demos and work my way up to insanity. :D
  • JCat wrote:
    @RedAndBlue -

    Thank you for your extensive reply. I'm prepping for the big day Monday, and will start off on the recommended demos and work my way up to insanity. :D

    No problem, I know how much I was scouring the forums to prepare before I got my Rift. Have fun when you get your new toy! Just remember, if you get nauseous: "It gets better!"
  • AryaXAryaX Posts: 42
    In the Tuscany demo it seems that if I move around at all, it only takes seconds until I start to feel rather nauseous.
    But if I lower the default FOV from the 111 to somewhere around 90 it doesn't feel quite as bad (I still get nauseous
    over time and some movements accelerate it but in general it takes much longer) and if I take the FOV somewhere
    well under 90, its back to being virtual vomiting medicine again...

    So it seems to me the "VR sickness" is at least partially about the game using wrong FOV... :roll:

    The Oculus Config Util, that came with the Tuscany Demo gives me some measure of my IPD but what about FOV ??
    Is there are any program for measuring your exact FOV with the Rift ??
  • geekmastergeekmaster Posts: 2,866
    Nexus 6
    I close my eyes while turning with an external controller, turning only in small steps. Dynamic FoV reduction based on turning speed may also help, as does dimming the screen somewhat while turning. Another software trick that may work is "black-frame insertion" while turning.

    Here is a "black frame insertion" demo, so you can see how it could help with turning in VR:
    http://www.testufo.com/#test=blackframes&count=2&equalizer=1

    Black-frame insertion simulates in software some of what an OLED display can give us (or a strobed backlight), but at a reduction in frame rate. But it increases stroboscopic effects, although it has been reported by some that stroboscopic motion ghosting causes less nausea for them than perceptual motion blur.

    And here is a demo for perceptual (eye-tracking) motion blur (a common complaint in the Rift):
    http://www.testufo.com/#test=eyetracking

    So, yeah, some of these can be compensated to some extent in software, bur for now, I just turn in baby steps and close my eyes while turning with a controller. No motion sickness that way.
  • I wonder if acupressure wristbands would help? I used to use them to cope with seasickness as a kid when my dad took me offshore fishing. Basically just a tight wristband on each wrist that somehow helps with nausea.
  • geekmastergeekmaster Posts: 2,866
    Nexus 6
    Nevolmon wrote:
    I wonder if acupressure wristbands would help? I used to use them to cope with seasickness as a kid when my dad took me offshore fishing. Basically just a tight wristband on each wrist that somehow helps with nausea.
    Solution for motion sickness (Sea bands): viewtopic.php?f=26&t=3534

    Motion sickness bands & Rift: http://www.mtbs3d.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?f=140&t=17544

    But we do have what appears to be a potential "local celebrity" endorsement:
    I tried the Sea-Bands before a long 2+ hour session on TF2 and I think they work. You can buy them for less than $10 ( http://www.amazon.com/Sea-Band-Adult-Wristband-Color-1-Pair/dp/B001F731N0 ). Granted, they still might be placebo, but that doesn't mean they don't work. Previously I had only clocked around 30 minutes in TF2 before feeling a little off balance. Lately, I've been feeling fine with the Rift, I guess I have gotten used to it. I don't know. But I think the bands might help.
    EDIT: And like other threads on this polarizing topic (such as those linked above), prepare yourself for the potential hot debate (or flame war) to follow in this thread, unless those who participated in the above threads have mellowed with time.
  • mscanfpmscanfp Posts: 659
    Sea Bands work for me at Great Adventure. Not feeling nauseous trumps knowing for sure whether or not it is a placebo effect.

    Mike
    Like to read? Cool, check out my author page on Amazon. I run free promotions all the time, and you might read something you like, http://www.amazon.com/Michael-Scanlon/e/B00KDPB88U/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
  • mscanfp wrote:
    Sea Bands work for me at Great Adventure. Not feeling nauseous trumps knowing for sure whether or not it is a placebo effect.

    Mike

    Yeah, don't take the red pill! :D
  • Pingles wrote:
    I think it's interesting that we have folks who DO get car sick who don't seem to get VR sick.

    And others that DON'T get car sick getting VR sickness.

    VR sickness seems to be a different animal and may be hard to fight for folks that get it bad.

    The last unscientific poll we did (MTBSD) found that most folks had no trouble at all, some had trouble for a while and a small percentage continued to have issues.

    I truly think it would be worthwhile to make a VR sickness testing app. An app that gave a menu of different scenarios to try so people could test themselves in different situations. Perhaps it could be used to pinpoint exactly what teh culprit is as far as game environments go. The app could even dump results back to a server to compile information. If you used personal IDs you could even track the effects over time.


    I get zero seasickness on boats or scuba diving, even with severe waves. I have a private pilots license and do aerobatics without getting any nausea at all. I lasted about 20mins in the rift before I felt so sick I had to take them off. As long as I have my eyes open and can see a horizon, I get no sickness no matter the activity, except on the rift!

    I think the mismatch of acceleration between the visuals and the inner ear is what causes it for me. As long as I am not moving in the rift it is okay. As soon as there is any in game acceleration that the rest of my body cannot feel, it protests quite violently. My mum gets motion sickness so severely she can't even ride a boat. The old lady spent hours in the rift no problems and I left it at her house for now.
  • planetarianplanetarian Posts: 14
    NerveGear
    discovering the intense nauseous feeling that the rift causes me was perhaps the saddest moment in recent memory for me. I've had my rift for several months now, and was eager to start playing with it and see what could be done with it, but to my despair it's simply sat upon a shelf most of the time.

    I've been looking forward to widely-accepted HMDs and VR and such for ages, and now that it's finally here I can't enjoy it. Within seconds of launching a game I feel terribly carsick, to varying degrees depending on the game, but it's gotten to the point where even imagining myself playing the Rift makes me feel nauseous.

    I've never had problems with boats, roller coasters, etc... but I'm the kind of person that starts feeling intense nausea if I start reading in a car. This is that very same feeling. It's quite terrible =(
  • drashdrash Posts: 2,847
    Neo
    Sorry to hear that planetarian! I'm hoping the new display tech in the Crystal Cove prototype solves that for you.
  • drash wrote:
    Sorry to hear that planetarian! I'm hoping the new display tech in the Crystal Cove prototype solves that for you.
    Yeah, hopefully this new display tech should solve problems in and of itself, but also the positional tracking/improved head tracking should go a long way to help out those who are experiencing persistent vr sickness months after their first vr experience. It could be that some people are just too sensitive to that missing sensation.
    But even with a theoretical future vr model with near zero latency, perfect head-to-toe tracking,and a magic screen there still may be people who still get sick from forward movement in general.
    Planetarian, do you find yourself getting sick in experiences like Blocked in or other static environments? Or is it tied to movement. Or should I not bring it up because it makes you feel sick?
    In any case, I feel your pain and hope the cv makes all your dreams come true.
Sign In or Register to comment.