Why aren't you in the finals? (venting thread) — Oculus
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Why aren't you in the finals? (venting thread)

nilstasticnilstastic Posts: 140
Hiro Protagonist
edited May 2015 in VR Jam 2015
So, why aren't you in the finals right now? Unfair screening process? Bugs? Bad luck? Or simply the fact that THE WORLD IS NOT READY FOR A JUMPING GAME. Let's vent here!

First reaction.
My first reaction when not reaching the finals was the classic "screw you guys, I'm going home". I put a whole months work into this, working after the kids got to bed until I was to tired to think. All this felt like wasted time, my heart sunk and the motivation for doing anything VR related just went out the window.

Then I stared at the ceiling for a bit.

Then I mustered up some courage and when I went though the list if found a lot of entries missing that I was sure to reach the finals, and I realized that i was not alone, and that made things a bit better.

The worst part
The wort part for me is that I really like my game, I've spent hours making the boss fight feel just right (for me), inventing lasers and modeling rockets - and It feels kind of sad not many people will be able to experience my vision of the best (and only) jumping game in the world.

But I do also realize that my game is special to me. As the creator I know every part of it, get nostalgic when moving through certain parts of it ("oh, the cold I had when i modeled that laser"). I am sure that everyone that made a game in the jam is connected to their game in a similar way. But that does not make me feel better, just more logical.

End game - what to do next
So, What to do. The screening jury has failed to realize that my game is awesome. Carmack will never be be able to tell me all the mistakes i made in it, and Palmer will never be featured in a stupid .gif jumping like the madman he truly is.

What to do..

Well, I got 25 videos of coworkers playing my game, and I got the exact reaction i was hoping for when they were playing (laughter). I've also gotten some great feedback from the community, and a few good review as well. And I really like my game, not because of nostalgia but because I like jumping, and I like lasers. But then again, Oculus does not like my game, or at least not in the way it needs to be liked. It might be the jumping, it might be the execution. The fact remains the same.

So, should I be a reasonable man and stop here.

Hell no!
I did not quit during the jam, and letting the anti-jumping lobby win is not an option! I'm going to finish the game, and I'll put it in the store where it belongs, judges be damned!

So, save up you dollars kids. Because this fall there will be a jumping game in the store, and it will be AWESOME.

// nils
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Comments

  • spire8989spire8989 Posts: 337
    Hiro Protagonist
    I enjoyed Kangaroo Dash, that's a shame!

    I almost tripped in real life on the laser crossing, but I had a good time. Definitely polish it and put it on the store, it's a great casual game, especially something I could see a lot of kids liking :D
  • NilspferdNilspferd Posts: 51
    So for our part, we should have focussed more on the description, screenshots and include the suggested headlines in our description (Mechanics, Innovation and Controls - nearly all selected entries have that headlines in their description). I always try to build games that are self-explanatory so we just put one sentence in the controls part. The other parts we mixed completly into one section, wich was a big mistake I guess.
  • AguaAgua Posts: 33 Oculus Start Member
    edited September 2015
    ...
  • SeradinSeradin Posts: 27
    Brain Burst
    There are so many great submissions that didn't make the cut :/ i wish that they could have increased the number that went on to finals. I hope that you don't give up because of this and that you finish up that game and put it on your store! I know i'd buy it :)
    Artist at Dual Reality Games working on PhaseShift!! VOTE NOW!! :D
    Website: colbypwahl.com
  • MoleVRMoleVR Posts: 7
    Agreed!

    When I Knew our game wasn't in the finalist,I felt really sad.I eagerly wanted to know why,what's wrong,which parts of our game were not good,was it the controls,the game design,or just we hadn't put these headlines in our description?
    I want to have some respond from the judges,and hope that will direct me in VR game developing in the future.

    The I carefully reviewed all the games in the finalist,I felt been totally cheated.Frankly,every game in the finalist has its own features.But there're few games,I can not understand why they could make the cut.Like the Blind Swordsman,with no images at all,just total black!And you can not move at all!I know that it used the Oculus Audio SDK to track the source of sound,then What?Abandon all the display function of Gear VR?Do you really think this is a good idea to increase players' sense of immersive?

    This jam,I consider,should be a guide to developers,to share the great ideas of VR,to find the promising field of VR,to figure out what are the best ways to make VR contents.It shouldn't be judged in such a fairness way!
  • tlkalltlkall Posts: 63
    There was nothing wrong with blind swordsman.. It was the only game made for the visually impaired.

    The silly one was Crime Watch. You can get into the finalist having a great but non-working innovation as mentioned by the description. But I'd have to admit it has amazing graphics and a probably interesting story line.

    Red riding seems the most polished game my money is on that one being a winner.
    nilstastic wrote:
    So, save up you dollars kids. Because this fall there will be a jumping game in the store, and it will be AWESOME.

    I'm going to make game free.
  • JoseJose Posts: 888
    Trinity
    My entry wasn't accepted into the finals because it emanates dangerously high levels of innovation, and the Jam Masters feel threatened by it.

    Just kidding.

    It's because it's literally a bunch of cubes with the default Unity skybox and 2 3D text objects. It would be a crime against humanity if my entry made it to the finals.

    I think I spent less than 3 hours on it, most of it was troubleshooting a few hours before the deadline.

    My minimum goal was to make it past milestone 4. Which I did. So in my own mind, I'm a winner! :D

    Time to celebrate! *wears VR Jam 2013 t-shirt like a hat*
  • spinaljackspinaljack Posts: 347 Oculus Start Member
    nilstastic wrote:
    So, save up you dollars kids. Because this fall there will be a jumping game in the store, and it will be AWESOME.

    // nils

    Hah, this FALL, classic XD

    I can just see all the youtube videos of kids smashing things in VR like they did with the wii mote controllers.

    I felt for sure this time you would get through.
  • creat326creat326 Posts: 84
    Yep, the criteria on the email was "scoring them based on promise and innovation" and 20% entries making the cut!

    During the past week I've downloaded, played, commented and voted around 100 different contestants.
    Several other games I've tested that are wayyy better than some in that list. And I don't mean a slight improvement/matter of taste/opinion. I mean pretty cool games that I clearly know those guys put their time and heart out to achieve in 30 days.

    That, just does not feel right. And then add to it that the judges do not even play the game, so it is all based on the description and videos! What can be worse selection criteria than that on a Jam where you are trying your best to get a working version by the deadline?

    So yeah, first time I feel unmotivated and sadden after a jam and I see no way to get the funds to continue development on my case. Just very disappointed at the whole experience after 30 days busting our behind doing work non-stop.
  • NilspferdNilspferd Posts: 51
    edited May 2015
    I don't complain, this jam helped me opening my eyes and finally realize that in games marketing is at least as important as the actual product. That's true for full games and that's true for other jams too. It's just true for every product I guess unless you're very lucky.
  • creat326creat326 Posts: 84
    Marketing is extremely important for games. Hugely important! (that's in fact part of getting into a VR Jam). What's not usually the case is that you have to do the marketing to the Jam itself.

    Once you go into the store or you are selected, that's usually the time you focus on all the pretty selling stuff: screenshots, cool intros, t-shirts, the Ferrari with your logo at the door...

    ps. and yep, I would love video reactions to first opening some of those and be like... so... now what?
  • MadManRMadManR Posts: 8
    NerveGear
    I admit: We were VERY disappointed. It doesn't seem fair that the finalists were chosen by a panel of people who apparently never played the game (my understanding is that the cut was made based on the video and other materials). Honestly we spent much more time making an awesome demo that we die on the video.

    But no hard feelings! We will move forward and finish the game and publish on as many platforms as possible. A little cashola would have made that easier.

    There is still time for all of you to check out our project and vote for it. We would love to win the community vote! Go top http://vrjam.challengepost.com/submissi ... struction#. PLAY our game. When you finally come out to reality, VOTE for our game!

    Robert
  • creat326creat326 Posts: 84
    oh boy, I hope this doesn't turn now into a spam contest "vote for me! vote for me!"

    I already voted the ones I really liked (some made it to the finalist list, some didn't). And I also tried to leave feedback on those.
  • dignifiedwebdignifiedweb Posts: 279
    Art3mis
    Finding out I didn't get in hurt me more than I thought it would actually. I put a lot of work into my little game. On Saturday I had a great opportunity to demo my game to 20+ people at a huge gaming event. I had zero negative feedback and lots of positive reactions from totally unbiased people. A couple pro game developers stopped by and tried my game, they said it was really cool. I was up front with them saying that I sort of mashed a bunch of assets together from free sources or the asset store.

    All that aside, I'm warming up to the idea of polishing it a bit more and attempting to publish it for free on the Gear VR store and Oculus Share. I think if people really do enjoy it, they'll ask for more features and such and at that point I can maybe consider making a full-fledged game.

    I had a lot of great feedback here already and from others. It's a shame that all of us tend to go into "review mode" when trying games. The ones I tried: Kangaroo Dash, Snowball Fight, Tank You, those 3 I thought would for sure make it in as they were way more professional than mine. I could name quite a few others like Islands in the sky for instance. That one had way more to do than mine, it's a shame we didn't get there. But, what we learned I think is the important part.

    I recently ported my game to a phone version using Gyro as a fake "head tracking" moving the phone around. It's pretty neat! But low and behold: If you turn the location services on, it uses Gyro + compass data and it messes it all up if it can't get a proper compass northing. So even something like location services can mess it up. How did oculus do such good head tracking? I think the little things like that I took for granted.

    I would personally like to thank Oculus for making an awesome SDK that gives easy access to hard stuff, so we can focus on the end product. The SDK may have been a buggy experience for lots of people. But seriously, at the end of the day, it's a lot of hard work getting that together, sorting through our comments, ultimately sifting through our work. That's my vent for today, thanks Oculus. Please post my game to share when I'm done, *cough cough*
    Check out my Mobile VR Jam 2015 title Man Overboard! - Try the DK2 Version if you don't have a Gear VR
  • NilspferdNilspferd Posts: 51
    edited May 2015
    [double post sorry]
  • HelloMeowHelloMeow Posts: 99
    Brain Burst
    I think I have a good idea why my game didn't make it. The graphics are very minimal and it looks very bare-bones. It's the game I wanted to make, with that style, but I didn't get to adding a lot of effects and gameplay that I think would have resonated with the style.

    I think that if I would have used some cliched tron-style graphics, or just something cheap that looked cool, the game would have done better.
    VRJam: Hexagon
  • ricard2798ricard2798 Posts: 432
    Hiro Protagonist
    I hear ya... but you know whats funny... i was thinking the exact opposite about my approach. When i started, i thought, i want to make a Vr game that feels like i am playing it on a PC... no polygon graphics with simple textures, but real arcade visuals and stuff. In addition, it must run smooth! What saddens me is that i think i did that. it ran smooth (maybe to 60fps, but above 50), and i spent time and time again optimizing. i also did a lot of different textures and environments. So now that i look at the winning entries, i go like... maybe that was my mistake.. I should have done a non textured, simple polygon game. i mean, why would someone want to experience a game like elite dangerous on their phone when they can do it on their PCs... mobility is overrated :P
    so there you have it.. one man things he needed better graphics... another (me) think he needs less graphics. what i know that i truly need is an antidepressant :P or need an internship on game making... or a good book on how to make games... because i am so badly lost its not even funny. One thing is to set some goals, and not reach them, and then be able to say.. well, i failed because i did not achieved my goals. But on my case (and maybe i am totally oblivious at how bad my game was), i thought I had met all my goals:
    -graphics = they were decent
    -level design = I had 4 levels, each with a different thing to do and even diff kind of environments
    -innovation = i still think the teleport beacon was cool and seldom seen in Vr
    -sound = could be worse, but i had original music and even used text to speech for voice overs
    -menus = I had warning signs, menus with select-able levels, etc
    -ease of access = I did a cockpit view to help with motion sickness.. and moreover, i made the camera way back into teh cockpit to reduce the effect
    all done by one single person... on his first jam... so honestly.. i did meet all my goals... so i figure that the problem with my project was the goals... i started with the wrong goals, so i ended with the wrong product to deliver. That is my fault... So if anyone knows a good read, tutorial, or book to help with this, please let me know, cause i really, really really need to know what i did wrong and how to correct it.. that is whats killing me the most
  • dignifiedwebdignifiedweb Posts: 279
    Art3mis
    I think I have a good idea why my game didn't make it. The graphics are very minimal and it looks very bare-bones. It's the game I wanted to make, with that style, but I didn't get to adding a lot of effects and gameplay that I think would have resonated with the style.

    I think that if I would have used some cliched tron-style graphics, or just something cheap that looked cool, the game would have done better.

    Your game was extremely smooth and very well done. The menu system was sweet and I still want to import my own track when I get a chance. Making a game based on audio isn't easy, I'd be interested to know how you ended up getting stuff on queue like that in your thread :)
    Check out my Mobile VR Jam 2015 title Man Overboard! - Try the DK2 Version if you don't have a Gear VR
  • HelloMeowHelloMeow Posts: 99
    Brain Burst
    Your game was extremely smooth and very well done. The menu system was sweet and I still want to import my own track when I get a chance. Making a game based on audio isn't easy, I'd be interested to know how you ended up getting stuff on queue like that in your thread :)

    Thanks. I used my music analysis package for Unity that I'm working on off and on. The hard part was optimizing it for mobile. When I first tested it, it ran at ~40 fps while just analyzing a song with nothing else going on. It's done on the fly, because otherwise you'd have to stare at a black screen for ~15 seconds.
    VRJam: Hexagon
  • creat326creat326 Posts: 84
    Can''t you save the analysis on a file? So it analyzes it the first time and then saves the values for the next run. It would run just slow the first time like that (maybe even add a loading screen or a "analysis/decompressing" bar on the first run).
    I don't think people would mind waiting 10 or 15 seconds the first time if you don't have to do it again.
  • HelloMeowHelloMeow Posts: 99
    Brain Burst
    creat326 wrote:
    Can''t you save the analysis on a file? So it analyzes it the first time and then saves the values for the next run. It would run just slow the first time like that (maybe even add a loading screen or a "analysis/decompressing" bar on the first run).
    I don't think people would mind waiting 10 or 15 seconds the first time if you don't have to do it again.

    It can and it used to do it like that, but it was cumbersome if you wanted to play a lot of different songs.

    But this is going completely off topic now :D
    VRJam: Hexagon
  • dpiddpid Posts: 44
    Brain Burst
    ricard2798 wrote:
    all done by one single person... on his first jam... so honestly.. i did meet all my goals... so i figure that the problem with my project was the goals... i started with the wrong goals, so i ended with the wrong product to deliver. That is my fault... So if anyone knows a good read, tutorial, or book to help with this, please let me know, cause i really, really really need to know what i did wrong and how to correct it.. that is whats killing me the most

    The thing with these types of contests is that you ultimately don't know exactly what the judges were looking for until it's over. Even then, it's kinda cloudy. Same goes for the court of public opinion. So, I feel your frustration, but it's nothing you did wrong per se. Although you didn't get the result you wanted, participating and completing a game is tremendous achievement in itself and can only make you a stronger developer. No tutorial or book has any magic answers. Just keep iterating and making more games. Study other games and form your opinions on what works and doesn't work. Also, often overlooked, but live life and learn things outside of games and bring those elements back in. Keep learning. A successful game will always be a roll of the dice, but you can continually increase the odds in your favor.
    Snow Fight VR Jam 2015 submission
  • FrooxiusFrooxius Posts: 181
    Hiro Protagonist
    I don't really belong here, since one of my entries made it to the finalists (although another one I had didn't, though I didn't really expect it to), but I just wanted to tell you guys to not lose motivation, especially when community liked your entry.

    Remember that there's only a handful of people judging these entries (and they haven't even tried the entries themselves yet, which I consider dumb, but that's whole another topic) and those people have their own tastes and preferences, so even if your entry didn't get picked, it doesn't mean it's bad, but just didn't resonate with the particular set of judges.

    If you put a lot of effort into your entry, it's definitely worth it to polish and release it, since the community doesn't comprise of just these few people - it's much more diverse than that and so should be the content we are creating.
  • TegTapTegTap Posts: 21
    I second what everyone said about polishing your game, putting it in the store, and letting it speak for itself to the users who want to play it, rather than dwell too long on a decision made by a small handful of people who didn't even play it at all.

    But since this is a venting thread...

    After playing some of the finalists' games, I applaud many of them for their stellar work and their great content! These ones earned and deserve a spot on the finalist list! However, after playing some of the other finalists' games... I guess I applaud them for making a sweet video. And completely disregarding the ~500 word limit in the ever-so-important description that so many of us painstakingly adhered to. Based on the judging method, maybe the VR in this particular jam stood for "Video Recording?" After playing some of these finalist games and comparing mine to them, I can honestly say that I can't answer the original question as to why my game isn't in the finals - and why many of your awesome games aren't either. I think a lot of our books were judged by their covers.

    I also believe it's unfortunate that there wasn't a consistent set of judges for each entry, or a consistent number of judges that looked at each entry. I feel like that adds even more subjectivity to the selection process, since the wrong combination of judges could adversely affect an entrant, or have the opposite effect (examples - an entrant was judged by a subset who skews low in scoring, or maybe one judge's set of entries happened to contain mostly poor apps, and therefore an entry was pitted only against the poorly done games, skewing that entry higher.) I don't see how there can be a baseline from which to compare entries when not all of the judges review all of the entries.

    That being said, I appreciate how hard it must be for the judges to narrow the entries down, even if I'm not in love with the process. I'm sure there are difficulties I'm not even aware of, and I'm sure it was a difficult job. I thank the mods, judges, and oculus in general for organizing this opportunity. And thanks for a venting platform too!
  • creat326creat326 Posts: 84
    edited May 2015
    Frooxius wrote:
    Remember that there's only a handful of people judging these entries (and they haven't even tried the entries themselves yet, which I consider dumb, but that's whole another topic) and those people have their own tastes and preferences, so even if your entry didn't get picked, it doesn't mean it's bad, but just didn't resonate with the particular set of judges.

    If you put a lot of effort into your entry, it's definitely worth it to polish and release it, since the community doesn't comprise of just these few people - it's much more diverse than that and so should be the content we are creating.

    I don't think anyone can argue that. Most of us are not afraid that our games would not be liked when we already saw great reaction from the random people we tested. Hey! I think I've only done one game with less than 1 million downloads! So not slightly worried about that.

    The problem is that here there is real prize money. And a serious and considerable amount for an indie developer. You may think I'm swimming on money because I've got games with millions of downloads but all my games are free to play and ads/in-app purchases barely cut the cost of development. If you are into the industry as I am, you know you need to either make your games not free and pray for jackpot or get millions and millions (and I mean dozens of millions) downloads so that ads/in-apps can cover the cost.

    So, for those of us that actually need the money to finish the complete game instead of leaving it at a half-done version, this contest was a great opportunity to go for it. The problem arises when some entries on there could potentially win monetary prize, even way more than they need, while other great/better/working games desperate for the funds or a marketing push, are going to be left behind due to an improper filter.

    The judging process should be as just as possible. It won't ever be perfect, but base it only on videos instead of actual gameplay it's like giving $ just for the idea while others are doing the actual work without recognition.
  • KatieTriPixelsKatieTriPixels Posts: 47
    Brain Burst
    creat326 wrote:
    So, for those of us that actually need the money to finish the complete game instead of leaving it at a half-done version, this contest was a great opportunity to go for it. The problem arises when some entries on there could potentially win monetary prize, even way more than they need, while other great/better/working games desperate for the funds or a marketing push, are going to be left behind.

    You can't tell who needs money and who doesn't based on pictures, video and a jam demo. Maybe they are marketing video creators in their day job, and wanting to start a games company?

    As for videos - my MS3 video was just me talking over it with my webcam mic, nothing more. My gameplay one was just a recording of the two halves of the game side by side and didn't even get finished before they closed entries. I'm terrible at editing videos so didn't bother. My screenshots you can tell are from the Unity Editor, didn't try to edit them, just used fraps. But where my talents are is in designing gameplay and passionately talking about it.

    They needed that prize fund to encourage a range of developers to try. From one man teams taking a holiday to do it, to larger companies who think that they may be compensated for their efforts but will use the Jam as a PR push. That way, they get a massive range of ideas, and they did.

    We probably wouldn't have entered if there was no prize, as it took out our two person team for a month, and a week extra to try and recover from the stress. That's over a month off our main game development, that we're still doing in our spare time after our day jobs, and our first as an indie games company.
    ______________
    @Katie_TriPixels
    Smash Hit Plunder “is one of Gear VR and indeed VR in general’s most curious and, much more importantly, fun upcoming videogames.” - VRFOCUS
  • creat326creat326 Posts: 84
    Yep, i'm not arguing who needs the money and who doesn't. I'm saying that deciding who can qualify for the prize (and a considerable important one) based solely on the videos and descriptions without any actual game testing, it's not fair to anybody.

    The argument is not whether you need the money, neither whether your game is good or bad and should or should not be released to the store. My understanding about the meaning of this thread is whether the system to decide the finalists was fair to you, and if not, why.

    In my case I know that if I had been into the finalist list, I would be very happy but I would certainly don't believe that deciding based on the video/description alone was a fair filter. I've tested tons of the entries and many (a pretty big amount), watching the description I was hyped up to download it, and once downloaded and placed on the device my reaction was: you gotta be kidding me. So the videos may allow for very bad entries to go through while leaving behind some awesome ones. Basically it misses the whole huge gap between idea and execution.
  • RazTOORazTOO Posts: 128
    creat326 wrote:
    So, for those of us that actually need the money to finish the complete game instead of leaving it at a half-done version, this contest was a great opportunity to go for it

    This sums everything perfectly IMO!

    Adding to this, we actually wanted to add more things like object interaction, where you woud choose something alongside walking through a door or maybe make a short combat scene. Also random events, but we aimed at a very simple game for others to understand.

    The important thing for us is that my collegue has done another game and I... done my first ever game :D I've use tons of tutorials some references + what i would like in a game on a small android device.
    We've put it together in a big package, with a simple idea we really wanted to execute for a 4-10min experience.

    I am very happy with the result we've got and never thought, that our game would make so many of our friends smile and meet so many awesome poeple here at the forums.
    I'm also running my YT channel from time to time evangelising about VR. I also gather a bunch of people @my univeristy from time to time to test VR together. We had 16 people and we played Dungeon Escape together :) They really liked it and were fascinated by VR. Most of them already played other VR games and were familiar - so unbiased opinions.

    We've also played other VRJam builds with Kangaroo Dash, being the most memorable and Crashland Reborn making girls squeek :P and Vektron Revenge - ahh those people yelling TRON FTW!!! :D

    We'll probably continue wrapping up our game, just to see other people opinions. They can be bad (heard those too) and we hope we'll get also the good ones too :)

    We've even got some followers on ChallengePost and likes, which is so awesome for this short period of time.

    Sure there was some confussion about the allowed bugfixes builds at some point ...and some quircks during the competition. There were also other "not so OK things" which still kinda bother me, which I won't mention ... so I guess we're all human and we make mistakes right ??? Right.
    I can also understand that primarily Oculus wants to promote mobileVR for people, and they won't take any risks in making people think VR is bad for them.

    All I am sure is, that we've uploaded a game in the required time window and demands. Most importantly we meet our goals.
    We had little to none feedback if our game is working ... but we uploaded our APK at the last moment.
    I can only hope that those games/apps who didn't make it ... were at least played by the "pre-selection" team, not only fast-judged by the trailers. If yes then I am totally OK with that.

    Special thanks here for people like: spinaljack, matt ratcliffe & others who helped us fight unity5 early bugs :P
    My YouTube Channel:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiusRc ... uNEoUS9g4A

    DracoDux - VRInput (under Development)
    https://youtu.be/GRRADXH5yzQ

    Dungeon Escape
    https://youtu.be/-AvUolM8Uxc
  • BinoBino Posts: 112
    Hiro Protagonist
    I'm not in the final because my entry was rubbish (http://challengepost.com/software/telegear). My excuse: I was travelling overseas for work for 3 weeks during the jam :)

    I'll throw my 2cent that I shared on reddit.
    I knew there'd be some butt hurt comments in here. (downvote city here I come) But I actually have to agree that innovation didn't appear to be a consideration across the board for the first round.
    Also not sure how SMS Racing (my favourite entry) got through as it's a remake of a previously developed game of the same name and mechanic.
    But I don't give shit. The bigger picture is for VR to succeed. Developers got involved, large companies got involved and creativity got involved.
    The real winner is VR and I'm happy with that.
    It's just a game jam.

    I do recall an email stressing how important the video and images are as they are what will be used for round 1. It's not like it was a big secret.

    I'll continue developing a GearVR game. And I think everyone here passionate enough to vent should too.
  • creat326creat326 Posts: 84
    edited May 2015
    I didn't know SMS racing was a clone. I've just read the description in detail http://holdenlink.com/project/sms-racing/
    But since they are the same company you can argue that the required changes are enough for participation.

    Also DRIFT is pretty much a clone of Superhot in gameplay, design and style http://superhotgame.com/ but it has some new game dynamics (you are the bullet instead of a person). I think they are walking a thin line between cloning or innovative.

    The "innovation" part was not very clear. I don't know if they meant innovation of a new game style or just innovation on how the VR was used on it.
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