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I think the brain may interpret VR like a dream - nausea

heynowbrowncow
Level 3
When you sleep you dream and see VR in your dream, not electronic VR, but biochemical VR. You see streets, and the outside, and people, and walk around, etc, in your dream, you do these things in the rift too, walking around and being outside and seeing other people I mean.

But in real life your head is on your pillow, and it is turned to one side so that your ear is against the pillow, this blocks sound from the real world getting in that ear.

Maybe by rift VR having sound in both ears this disrupts the sounds the brain thinks it should get with VR, and this disruption causes nausea, or helps you feel nausea.

The brain thinks VR is associated with one ear hearing less of the real world than the other ear. One ear against the pillow hears less of the real world and so is dedicated to the VR experience the dream provides.

So with all that said, here is my idea. Have an ear bud noise cancelling headphone in the one ear, the left ear, and this is the only ear that hears the VR, the other ear hears things in the real world like a fan blowing to cool the room, or ambient noise from the real world.

This should cut down on the nausea feeling. Try it out. Put the VR sound in headphones, the noise cancelling ear bud type, and put the ear bud in only one ear, the other ear hears the real world make noise like a fan blowing.
19 REPLIES 19

heynowbrowncow
Level 3
Using the first posts logic now. I think if the eyes behave like the ears do with this VR hearing, then only one eye should have real time head to display motion sync, the other eye, not the dominant eye, should have some lag to the head motion to what is displayed on screen, just an imperceptible amount.

This should let the brain relate the eyes to think they are in a dream and help stop nausea. That is if the eyes behave like the ears, and the ears work based on the head resting on a pillow during a dream.

genetransfer
Level 3
I must say I don't hear audio in my dreams except when something is playing in the background IRL. I'll never forget when I fell asleep in front of the tv and the exorcist came on tv whilst asleep, lets say my dream got real freaky. I woke up to it and realized why. Offtopic but I also think when it feels like your running through quicksand in a dream it is because your body is getting engaged and it's pushing against the bed in your dreams feeling like quicksand, I found I get that feeling when ever trying to use my body rather than thought/feeling in dreams. Edit: honestly I think dreams aren't comparable to vr as you are truly tele-present and borderline OBE (at least that's how I feel) vr still has the meat to deal with.

heynowbrowncow
Level 3
I understand the audio part about dream not having audio, but when you dream your ear is against the pillow blocking sound in one ear.

When you dream you experience the dream, but your mind is also processing the fact the one ear is against the pillow so has muffled hearing, and the other ear has noise in it coming from somewhere out there.

darkcrayon
Level 3
"heynowbrowncow" wrote:
I understand the audio part about dream not having audio, but when you dream your ear is against the pillow blocking sound in one ear.

When you dream you experience the dream, but your mind is also processing the fact the one ear is against the pillow so has muffled hearing, and the other ear has noise in it coming from somewhere out there.


...Assuming you're not sleeping on your back.

grodenglaive
Level 2
Indeed, I tend to dream more when I'm on my back and I've never gotten nauseous while dreaming.
Anyway, you're losing a lot from vr without full 3D audio, so that's not rally an acceptable solution (even if it worked).
GA-Z97X-gaming gt; i5-4670k; Nvidia780Ti; 16GB PC3-17066; win7-64 bit; DK2

heynowbrowncow
Level 3
Sure you dream sleeping on your back, with your head tilted to the left or right.

scottycam
Level 2
I personally don't think sleeping on a pillow has any effect on dreams. I often sleep on my back with my head directly forward anyway.

Additionally pillows are very new to humans if you take our entire existence into account, so for the majority of human evolution we had our dreams without a pillow muffling one ear.

Also VR is very different to a dream, dreaming is triggered at a specific point in our sleep cycle whereas VR is experienced while we are completely awake, physically using our eyes, ears and moving. The brain would see VR as reality, not a dream, which is why when VR isn't done perfectly our brains think there is something wrong and you get sick.

Using this logic if we were to muffle the sound in one ear while using VR it would likely add to the brains decision that something is wrong.

heynowbrowncow
Level 3
Hmm, you may be right, but you never know until you get somebody who feels nausea try it with the earbud in only one ear to find out, init?

VizionVR
Level 8
There is a very strong connection between VR and dreams and these links are being diligently studied. Eventually, Virtual Reality combined with AI will become so advanced it can replicate lucid dreaming in a fully conscious state. I predict that Virtual Reality will become a great tool for psychological studies as well as the purest drug our minds will ever know.
Not a Rift fanboi. Not a Vive fanboi. I'm a VR fanboi. Get it straight.