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Invited 6 friends over to try out the CV1...

HiThere_
Level 9
All six of them had tried out the Gear VR before, four of them wore glasses :
- None of them wanted to even try wearing their glasses in the CV1 (only one out of four had small enough glasses anyway).
- The two who didn't wear glasses were able to confirm that the display felt noticeably superior (despite the Gear VR boasting a higher resolution).
- The two who were given a chance to walk in first person at the end of their session got motion sickness within minutes (despite using my sea-bands, and being warned not to use the right thumbstick for rotating the view which they did anyway).
- Only one of them was aware of hand controllers and asked about it (I explained the multiple reasons for their delay).
- Five out of six ended up on their smartphone instead of watching on the huge TV what the sixth one with the CV1 was doing : My friends are all smartphone addicts ^^°°°
- At the end all six wondered why a high end VR headset didn't include the focus
dial of a cheap Gear VR (no idea because I don't remember Oculus VR ever officially
explaining it, just random guys providing their own speculation about it. My own random speculation is that after working on the CV1 for years, Oculus VR employees all went lenses/lasik and lost touch with the real world users who didn't, don't want to and won't).
- Also I ran into multiple Xbox disconnect issues from running the CV1 further
away from the PC then I usually do : Now I know why there's an extension cable included
for the gamepad dongle.

Conclusion :
- Don't use ANY motion sickness inducing software on a first day, no matter how good it is : My biggest and most obvious mistake, after forgetting how bad it was on my own first day.
- Watching someone use VR even on a huge TV screen ends up boring (despite providing each user a different set of VR experiences), and Oculus VR is missing out the ability for a bunch of VR users to interact with the single CV1 user, which might become a big selling point for the Playstation VR instead : Not a big issue (invite less people at a time), but Oculus VR could have encouraged that kind of hybrid interaction by including a handful of their (super cheap ?) remotes instead of the single one.
- Glass wearers spoiled by the Gear VR won't even try fitting their glasses in a VR Headset (and even less go buy themselves a pair of VR glasses small enough to fit) : They want a focus dial.

I did have Hydra Controllers stored away, but was saving them for the next time : Not just the cable issue, but I guessed after introducing the first one to 6D input they would have all lost interest in anything else I could show them this first time, as surely as with the Gear VR they had already lost any interest in using anything less then a focus dial.

I mentioned glasses a lot, but that's because a majority of four out of six of them lost out on their CV1 experience for being glass wearers, which left even the two non glass wearers puzzled about how Samsung managed to pull it off right last year with a 99$ product. With the lack of focus dial being the main issue none of them otherwise complained about the cable, god rays, tracking, latency, headset comfort or any other issue getting in their way.
16 REPLIES 16

GenetixStudio
Level 9
I try not to show it to a lot of people at once - just one person over at a time. VR can be boring to watch someone else play, or at least make you wish you were the one inside of it 😉 So far nearly everyone I have shown it to has been all but blown away! 

Anonymous
Not applicable

Cyril said:

All six of them had tried out the Gear VR before, four of them wore glasses :
- None of them wanted to even try wearing their glasses in the CV1 (only one out of four had small enough glasses anyway).
- The two who didn't wear glasses were able to confirm that the display felt noticeably superior (despite the Gear VR boasting a higher resolution).
- The two who were given a chance to walk in first person at the end of their session got motion sickness within minutes (despite using my sea-bands, and being warned not to use the right thumbstick for rotating the view which they did anyway).
- Only one of them was aware of hand controllers and asked about it (I explained the multiple reasons for their delay).
- Five out of six ended up on their smartphone instead of watching on the huge TV what the sixth one with the CV1 was doing : My friends are all smartphone addicts ^^°°°
- At the end all six wondered why a high end VR headset didn't include the focus
dial of a cheap Gear VR (no idea because I don't remember Oculus VR ever officially
explaining it, just random guys providing their own speculation about it. My own random speculation is that after working on the CV1 for years, Oculus VR employees all went lenses/lasik and lost touch with the real world users who didn't, don't want to and won't).
- Also I ran into multiple Xbox disconnect issues from running the CV1 further
away from the PC then I usually do : Now I know why there's an extension cable included
for the gamepad dongle.

Conclusion :
- Don't use ANY motion sickness inducing software on a first day, no matter how good it is : My biggest and most obvious mistake, after forgetting how bad it was on my own first day.
- Watching someone use VR even on a huge TV screen ends up boring (despite providing each user a different set of VR experiences), and Oculus VR is missing out the ability for a bunch of VR users to interact with the single CV1 user, which might become a big selling point for the Playstation VR instead : Not a big issue (invite less people at a time), but Oculus VR could have encouraged that kind of hybrid interaction by including a handful of their (super cheap ?) remotes instead of the single one.
- Glass wearers spoiled by the Gear VR won't even try fitting their glasses in a VR Headset (and even less go buy themselves a pair of VR glasses small enough to fit) : They want a focus dial.

I did have Hydra Controllers stored away, but was saving them for the next time : Not just the cable issue, but I guessed after introducing the first one to 6D input they would have all lost interest in anything else I could show them this first time, as surely as with the Gear VR they had already lost any interest in using anything less then a focus dial.

I mentioned glasses a lot, but that's because a majority of four out of six of them lost out on their CV1 experience for being glass wearers, which left even the two non glass wearers puzzled about how Samsung managed to pull it off right last year with a 99$ product. With the lack of focus dial being the main issue none of them otherwise complained about the cable, god rays, tracking, latency, headset comfort or any other issue getting in their way.



People that can't tear themselves away from their phones drive me nuts. It's an epidemic.

As far as dials etc. I'm sure the weight and comfort of the HMD was the primary reason and giving the best experience to the largest number of people (non-glasses wearers).

Hate to say it but I'm glad there are no dials or adjustments as I don't need/wear glasses nor would I want the additional weight those mechanics would add nor the bulk. If it was as easy to remove the dials/mechances as it is to buy smaller glasses/use contacts (My brother-in-law did exactly that, bought smaller glasses) then it wouldn't be a problem.

Same thing with the strap size, there are some people who can't fit the rift on their head without modifying the staps because they don't adjust large enough.

My wife/daughter wear glasses though and use the rift...without there glasses on, it was a bit blurry to them... but that probably helped the image quality. 🙂

TwoHedWlf
Level 11
75% with poor eyesight.  Minus the percentage that can focus at 1.5m distance.  Minus the percentage with astigmatism or difference prescriptions for each eye which would make the HMD focus poor.  Minus the percentage whose glasses fit comfortably in the HMD.

I think given the option right now I'd probably rather wear my glasses.  It's completely hassle free VS having to take off my glasses, find somewhere safe to put them, then put on the HMD.

HiThere_
Level 9
I was curious about roughly how many people have bad eyesight so I Googled it :
- 60% of the total population (adult + children)
- 75% of the adult population.

Basically
unless you're a troglodyte with perfect eyesight the odds a focus dial
would have benefited someone trying out your CV1 out sooner or later is
close to 100%, and when an affordable feature has a nearly 100% chance
of significantly improving the experience, you don't find an excuse to
skip it as much as you go out of your way to find yourself a way to
include it.

I think of focus dials this way :
-
Glass users are a significant percentage of the population (and most
CV1s will have more then one user because of how rare and expensive it is).
- Significantly cheaper and lighter to include then the less
convenient and more expensive alternative solutions glass users have to
come up with (a single pair of VR Lens cost as much as the whole Gear
VR...).
- Significantly improves the experience for that significant
amount of glass users (it's like swapping one pair of glasses for
another, it's that good).
- Too cheap and too light to negatively impact non glass users.
-
I feel plain silly failing to explain why my "high-end" ~2000$ CV1 VR
configuration can't match a basic feature the multiple times cheaper
Gear VR introduced a year ago 😞
- The lack of focus dials has
clearly restrained my enjoyment and amount of usage of VR, and has even
more crippled my ability to share what that VR experience should have
been with other users (over half of them). Also without their glasses
they couldn't read any text (either in-game or during the calibration
process), which turned even the most basic interactions into a struggle.

PIXELATED
Level 5
One of the biggest disappointments of the Oculus CV1 is the lack of Diopter Adjustment for individual eyes (diopter- google search)

Cameras have had this for years, Binoculars also cater for all.  Strange that R&D (research and development) never made this a priority @ Oculus... maybe it was statistically too un-worthwhile?

Like the OP I have invited folk over to use the Rift. Most have preferred to take their glasses off and put contact lenses in to enjoy the experience after struggling with their glasses.

Six people to show off VR is too much to handle.. as folk get bored watching everyone else having vr fun.  In the times when I’ve introduced VR, two friends at a time I’ve nurtured the experience starting with “Dreamdeck’ then a few “Mr Robot” experiences and videos & then if they are still standing carefully coaxed them on to a roller coaster or two - whilst sitting.  9 times out of ten they need to lie down for a while till they are capable of taking on more.













This VR thing is something else if you’re not prep'd for it. Hold a hand (or something) sit down or show them a bucket before VR ! 

Win 10 Pro, GTX 1080, Asus Z170 Deluxe, Nvidia 391.35

HiThere_
Level 9

TwoHedWlf said:

I think given the option right now I'd probably
rather wear my glasses.  It's completely hassle free VS having to take
off my glasses, find somewhere safe to put them, then put on the HMD.

Well out of 5 people I know who were given the option to use a Gear VR without their glasses, none of them wanted to go back to wearing them in a VR headset (and none of them bought contact lenses for the sake of VR either).

Basically with a focus dial the VR headset becomes your pair of glasses, which beats wearing two pair of glasses.

Gwiz84
Level 7
I've only had four people try it so far, due to ppl being on vacation etc. But I usually put them through a few dreamdeck demos (only the best ones) and "introduction to virtual reality" demo, to ease them into the experience. I then put on a game like edge of nowhere or something and from then on just let them explore the different games etc.