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Getting the right prescription for lens inserts or Go dedicated glasses

voxelmaniam
Level 5
This thread is a continuation of one started by user haydon.sheppard here:
https://forums.oculusvr.com/community/discussion/comment/613239#Comment_613239

Summary
Not everyone has the best visual experience when first strapping on the Oculus Go. Some users are reporting an inability to get a clear, focused image on the Go display. Barring some fault in a specific Go's assembly most if not all of the focus issues boil down to one or a combination of four things.
1) The Go headset is incorrectly positioned in front of the users eyes.
2) The media content that is being viewed is out of focus or low resolution and thus appears blurry.
3) The user's eyes require corrective lenses and they are not being worn.
4) The corrective lens inserts or glasses worn by the user are unsuited to the optical working distance of the Go.

This discussion will focus on item 4.
The Go can be worn comfortably with glasses but depending upon an individual's prescription a particular set of glasses may not work well with the Go's optics. The case in point that has been under discussion in the thread mentioned above is where the prescription being worn contains a progressive or no-line bifocal configuration and the user's eyes also have fixed focus lens implants as a result of cataract surgery. The particular lenses being worn allow a mixture of focal distances depending upon the vertical angle of view: Straight ahead - distance focus, angled down - near focus. Along with other factors related to the manufacture of progressive optics this causes a significant narrowing of the visual field that can be seen in focus. This means that the eyes can't be rotated to see other parts of the scene. Rather the head must be rotated to see other parts of the scene in focus, for example when reading across the page in the browser.

The solution to this problem is to get single focus glasses. However, for for optimum performance with the Go they should be prescribed for the Go's optical working distance. That is the apparent distance that the Go's optics simulate when when you look through them. For a young person that requires corrective glasses, with natural lenses in their eyes, the distance vision correction prescribed by the eye doctor is sufficient because their eyes can accommodate to the Go's optical working distance. For older users such as myself and particularly because I have fixed focus lens implants, a prescription must be calculated specifically for the Go's optical working distance.

My quest for the right prescription started with my eye doctor. He said that he would have to know more about the Go's optical working distance to write a prescription. I then went to Frames Direct, Oculus' provider of choice for lens inserts. They said they didn't have that information, they worked only with the distance vision prescription and referred me to Oculus support. At first Oculus support referred me to my eye doctor and Frames Direct but with additional (repeated) explanation they are looking deeper (higher) for information about the Go's optical working distance. Cybereality has suggested that the optical working distance is in the range from 1 to 1.5 meters. I'm hoping for something a bit more precise, say within plus or minus 1 inch.

Stay tuned...
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster
36 REPLIES 36

voxelmaniam
Level 5

Ravenger said:



Ravenger, what does VDU stand for?


Visual Display Unit, or more colloquially, a computer screen.


Suspected that to be the meaning but I didn't want to assume. Could have been some esoteric device that I hadn't yet encountered.
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster

Alun101_uk
Level 3
Anybody here tried Go with contact lenses?
surely that must be easier that using glasses or buying modified lenses?

voxelmaniam
Level 5
I'm sure that for persons that can wear them they will work fine since younger eyes tend to have a much better range of focus then persons in my age range (late 60's). Contact lenses are contraindicated for persons with Glaucoma and many other eye afflictions. Besides contact lenses don't provide the same degree of optical precision afforded by conventional eyewear. 
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster

theruleslawyer
Level 3
I know this is a little old, but look for information from competition shooting on getting this sort of lens made. Not many doctors deal regularly in distance vision other than infinity. 

Here's a good guide on getting your doctor to write a prescription for exactly the lens you need.
https://www.starreloaders.com/edhall/nwongmain/eyeguide.html

voxelmaniam
Level 5


I know this is a little old, but look for information from competition shooting on getting this sort of lens made. Not many doctors deal regularly in distance vision other than infinity. 

Here's a good guide on getting your doctor to write a prescription for exactly the lens you need.
https://www.starreloaders.com/edhall/nwongmain/eyeguide.html


This is such an awesome document. We need to find an optometrist that is similarly interested in VR and is willing to devote a significant amount of time to researching what I suspect are a diverse range of eye conditions and the appropriate corrective optics required to optimize the VR experience. This might be a subject to suggest for a graduate thesis.
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster

Spuzzum
Level 9
I know this is old, but a tweet from John Carmack:

https://twitter.com/ID_AA_Carmack/status/1130973138362294272

voxelmaniam
Level 5

Spuzzum said:

I know this is old, but a tweet from John Carmack:

https://twitter.com/ID_AA_Carmack/status/1130973138362294272


Thank you for bringing this up to date. I had received some private communications to this effect but, if I remember correctly, there was legal language attached that implied that it wasn't to be distributed publicly. It doesn't get much more public than John Carmack. 😄
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster