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Getting the right prescription for lens inserts or Go dedicated glasses

voxelmaniam
Level 5
This thread is a continuation of one started by user haydon.sheppard here:
https://forums.oculusvr.com/community/discussion/comment/613239#Comment_613239

Summary
Not everyone has the best visual experience when first strapping on the Oculus Go. Some users are reporting an inability to get a clear, focused image on the Go display. Barring some fault in a specific Go's assembly most if not all of the focus issues boil down to one or a combination of four things.
1) The Go headset is incorrectly positioned in front of the users eyes.
2) The media content that is being viewed is out of focus or low resolution and thus appears blurry.
3) The user's eyes require corrective lenses and they are not being worn.
4) The corrective lens inserts or glasses worn by the user are unsuited to the optical working distance of the Go.

This discussion will focus on item 4.
The Go can be worn comfortably with glasses but depending upon an individual's prescription a particular set of glasses may not work well with the Go's optics. The case in point that has been under discussion in the thread mentioned above is where the prescription being worn contains a progressive or no-line bifocal configuration and the user's eyes also have fixed focus lens implants as a result of cataract surgery. The particular lenses being worn allow a mixture of focal distances depending upon the vertical angle of view: Straight ahead - distance focus, angled down - near focus. Along with other factors related to the manufacture of progressive optics this causes a significant narrowing of the visual field that can be seen in focus. This means that the eyes can't be rotated to see other parts of the scene. Rather the head must be rotated to see other parts of the scene in focus, for example when reading across the page in the browser.

The solution to this problem is to get single focus glasses. However, for for optimum performance with the Go they should be prescribed for the Go's optical working distance. That is the apparent distance that the Go's optics simulate when when you look through them. For a young person that requires corrective glasses, with natural lenses in their eyes, the distance vision correction prescribed by the eye doctor is sufficient because their eyes can accommodate to the Go's optical working distance. For older users such as myself and particularly because I have fixed focus lens implants, a prescription must be calculated specifically for the Go's optical working distance.

My quest for the right prescription started with my eye doctor. He said that he would have to know more about the Go's optical working distance to write a prescription. I then went to Frames Direct, Oculus' provider of choice for lens inserts. They said they didn't have that information, they worked only with the distance vision prescription and referred me to Oculus support. At first Oculus support referred me to my eye doctor and Frames Direct but with additional (repeated) explanation they are looking deeper (higher) for information about the Go's optical working distance. Cybereality has suggested that the optical working distance is in the range from 1 to 1.5 meters. I'm hoping for something a bit more precise, say within plus or minus 1 inch.

Stay tuned...
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster
36 REPLIES 36

voxelmaniam
Level 5


Still no definitive answer Murray?


I pinged Oculus support yesterday after not hearing anything for 4 days. I was told they are still looking into an answer for my question. I really don't understand why it is such a mystery. But given that it does intersect with the subject of eye health it may not be something they want to treat with an off the cuff answer.
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster

haydon_sheppard
Level 3
Well Murray. I hope the answer is worth the waiting for. Lol.
I’m still interested to know how I approach an Optician with a request for single vision glasses for the Go and how they even think about conducting an eye test on that basis?
Anyone else reading this encountered this scenario yet?

Roaster
Level 8
I can tell you my experience.  I have a pair of glasses with a single distance grind measured for 24", mainy intended for computer use.  They work perfectly with both the Rift and Go.  Progressive bi-focals would be the worst choice, for the same reason you might tilt your head back and look through the lower part of the lens to get a good focus on your pc screen.  You can't do that with a headset on which moves with your head angle.
For some users the main benefit of prescription glasses is correction of astigmatism, which for the uninformed will manifest itself as a warping of the perspective, usually with a cylindrical lens effect instead of the normal spherical surface.  With my pc glasses everything in the Go is tack sharp.
i7-5820K @ 4.2Ghz, water cooled, Asus X99-Pro USB 3.1, 48 Gb DDR4 2400, Samsung 950 pro M.2 SSD, GTX 980 Ti SC, 750w psu

voxelmaniam
Level 5
Wish that I had something to report but I haven't heard word one out of Oculus. I even copied John Carmack without result. I'm glad to hear Roaster's results but I think I'm going to be patient and see if any thing comes from Oculus. In the meantime I've gone back to my optician and asked them to give me the single vision calculation for the monitor distance glasses that I purchased last year. I then purchased an inexpensive pair of single focus glasses. They are an improvement over the progressives but I still feel that I could do better. I may eventually go for the inserts. I also have to face the reality that I have significant vision lose in both eyes and my experience is never going to be as good as someone with 20/20 vision and perfect fields.
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster

TwoHedWlf
Level 11
The best solution might be to get lasik.  I'm thinking about it.  I can afford the $6000 it costs, but...The idea of laying there while someone shoots lasers and then peels a big chunk of eyeball back so they can shoot more lasers...

Kinda freaks me the fuck out.

voxelmaniam
Level 5
LASIK isn’t an option once you have lens implants.
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster

haydon_sheppard
Level 3
I’m off to the opticians in a few days to get a single vision prescription for the Go. Not sure what reception I will get. All seems a bit hit and miss. I will take the Go along.  I presume I don’t need wi-fi to get some sort of display up?
i can’t believe that Murray is still waiting to an answer from Oculus about the viewing distance! 
I will relay back my experiences. Anyone already gone through this process?

haydon_sheppard
Level 3
sorry if this has already appeared in another forum

haydon_sheppard
Level 3
Just seen the WidmoVR prescription lenses. Sounds like a perfect solution but it all rests on getting the right prescription in the first place. Ie. What viewing distance does your optician use for the Go?

voxelmaniam
Level 5


Just seen the WidmoVR prescription lenses. Sounds like a perfect solution but it all rests on getting the right prescription in the first place. Ie. What viewing distance does your optician use for the Go?


I'm not sure if you are addressing me or someone else. The computer glasses are for right around 24" although I don't recall that they stated a specific distance. Apparently they have a standard calculation for computer glasses but my working distance is right around 24" to 26". The range for acceptable focus for me seems to be from about 18" to 32" with the fuzzes setting in closer and further than that range. However, I'm beginning to feel that I should have a pair of glasses made with my distance focus values + astigmatism correction. WidmoVR told me that was the prescription that they wanted even after I told them about all of my issues.
A voxel is a three dimensional pixel!
Murray Foster