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Can You Guys Please Let Us Test Link Features Wirelessly?

Popcorntech
Level 3
I watched Carmack's keynote a couple times, and after he stated the cable would be capable of 150mb/s I started tinkering with my own local transfer rates between my wired desktop and my wireless laptop. Both devices are in the same room I would be testing Quest.

After a LOT of tinkering, I was able to maintain a stable transfer rate of 300mb/s over an hour using my Ubiquity LR-AC AP and Edgerouter. Once I was able to get this stable, I was able to run several -i 65500 ping tests and observed an extremely low latency over time as well. I am happy with where I ended up! 

Now obviously I could try this with the Quest using ALVR or Virtual Desktop sideloading, but if I did that I would miss out on all the features of Oculus Link, like the rendering techniques. There are obviously so many low level things that Oculus can do that these third parties cant since they own the hardware and OS. Not only that, but I wouldn't be able to access my library of content on Oculus Home without using Revive. I'm not nearly as interested in ALVR + Revive on Oculus Home as I am testing the fully fledged Link features wirelessly.  

I wouldn't even mind if I have to jump through a lot of hoops to try this. I get that most people can't get a fast local speed with a low latency over wifi. I don't think it would be poisoning the well if Oculus made wireless Link features tedious to enable, but I totally understand if this doesn't end up getting supported. I just wanted to make my case and see if I could change anyone's mind about it. I was crossing my fingers for this to be a launch feature, but I do realize how incredibly unlikely that is. 

I would love to compare my wireless setup to the tethered experience on day 1!  
10 REPLIES 10

Spuzzum
Level 9
Seeing as the update makes the pc recognize the Quest as a Rift, I'm hoping that Virtual Desktop might work. If not, I'm sure ggodin could come up with a fix. Or...Oculus releases their own streaming app.

Popcorntech
Level 3
I think if they made their own streaming app, it would need to be enabled via a beta feature checkbox or something. Wouldn't want people trying it and having a terrible experience because they don't understand that the experience is bad because of their own setup. I can see the 2/5 star reviews now lol. Like I said, jumping through hoops is better in this situation.
If nothing else, the few that enable wireless could give the Oculus team some insight on how enthusiasts use it and such (not to mention big profile reviewers like LTT will make videos about it). Even if my wireless setup works beautifully, I will still purchase a Link cable to compare the experience and also use the Quest + my Aero Oled laptop on the go. I obviously can't count on random networks to sustain a local wireless transfer speed faster than 150mb/s consistently, so it's not like wireless beta features remove the need for me to purchase a Link cable either. 

falken76
Level 13
I think if it were possible or practical they would have tried going in that direction to keep Quest wireless.  Ubiquity is up there with Meraki.  They're pretty much enterprise level, do consumers really get these?  I got my Meraki by sitting in on some boring web meeting for work and they sent it for free hoping you'll sign up for expensive recurring services.  I'm still in my 3 year free period.  Will a D-link work in the same way a Meraki or Ubiquity would?  It would be really cool though if they did leave an option for those that have these awesome routers and equipment though.

nalex66
Volunteer Moderator
Volunteer Moderator
Carmack did say that wireless would be the next step, but I could see them releasing their own wireless USB dongle to plug into the PC, rather than depending on the user's wifi. That would give the Quest a dedicated wireless signal to connect to, with hopefully less interference from other devices, and would allow Oculus to control the end-to-end data flow to minimize latency.

i7 5820K @ 4.25GHz | RTX 3080 Ti FTW3 | Gigabyte GA-X99-UD4 | Corsair DDR4 3000 32GB | Corsair HX 750W
SSDs: Intel 660p M.2 2TB, 3x Samsung Evo 1TB | Startech PCIe 4x USB 3.0 | Startech PCIe 2x USB C 3.1 gen2

Popcorntech
Level 3
A USB dongle would certainly make the wireless experience more accessible to everyone. I do realize how unlikely it is that just because I have high quality networking equipment that I will get to use it with Quest in an officially supported capacity. When I get my Quest, I will update this thread with the tests. Keep in mind that the dual band LR-AP I am using is under $100, so if you want to do the same thing, it really isn't that cost prohibitive. 

nalex66
Volunteer Moderator
Volunteer Moderator
I get good results streaming SteamVR via Virtual Desktop, as long as I'm in the same room as the modem. I'm getting a good 866 Mbps connection, and latency doesn't feel too bad. If I go to another floor of the house, the signal drops to ~150 Mbps, and the quality degrades quickly. If/when Oculus releases a wireless streaming solution, I hope it's capable of providing a strong signal over a good distance, so I'm not limited to playing in the room that my PC is in.

i7 5820K @ 4.25GHz | RTX 3080 Ti FTW3 | Gigabyte GA-X99-UD4 | Corsair DDR4 3000 32GB | Corsair HX 750W
SSDs: Intel 660p M.2 2TB, 3x Samsung Evo 1TB | Startech PCIe 4x USB 3.0 | Startech PCIe 2x USB C 3.1 gen2

vargablood
Level 5


I watched Carmack's keynote a couple times, and after he stated the cable would be capable of 150mb/s I started tinkering with my own local transfer rates between my wired desktop and my wireless laptop. Both devices are in the same room I would be testing Quest.

After a LOT of tinkering, I was able to maintain a stable transfer rate of 300mb/s over an hour using my Ubiquity LR-AC AP and Edgerouter. Once I was able to get this stable, I was able to run several -i 65500 ping tests and observed an extremely low latency over time as well. I am happy with where I ended up! 

Now obviously I could try this with the Quest using ALVR or Virtual Desktop sideloading, but if I did that I would miss out on all the features of Oculus Link, like the rendering techniques. There are obviously so many low level things that Oculus can do that these third parties cant since they own the hardware and OS. Not only that, but I wouldn't be able to access my library of content on Oculus Home without using Revive. I'm not nearly as interested in ALVR + Revive on Oculus Home as I am testing the fully fledged Link features wirelessly.  

I wouldn't even mind if I have to jump through a lot of hoops to try this. I get that most people can't get a fast local speed with a low latency over wifi. I don't think it would be poisoning the well if Oculus made wireless Link features tedious to enable, but I totally understand if this doesn't end up getting supported. I just wanted to make my case and see if I could change anyone's mind about it. I was crossing my fingers for this to be a launch feature, but I do realize how incredibly unlikely that is. 

I would love to compare my wireless setup to the tethered experience on day 1!  


theres a big gap between 150MB/s using a cable or 300mbit/s using wlan.
You need 1500mbit/s to get 150MB/s comparable speed.
Bit or Byte makes a huge difference 🙂

Spuzzum
Level 9




I watched Carmack's keynote a couple times, and after he stated the cable would be capable of 150mb/s I started tinkering with my own local transfer rates between my wired desktop and my wireless laptop. Both devices are in the same room I would be testing Quest.

After a LOT of tinkering, I was able to maintain a stable transfer rate of 300mb/s over an hour using my Ubiquity LR-AC AP and Edgerouter. Once I was able to get this stable, I was able to run several -i 65500 ping tests and observed an extremely low latency over time as well. I am happy with where I ended up! 

Now obviously I could try this with the Quest using ALVR or Virtual Desktop sideloading, but if I did that I would miss out on all the features of Oculus Link, like the rendering techniques. There are obviously so many low level things that Oculus can do that these third parties cant since they own the hardware and OS. Not only that, but I wouldn't be able to access my library of content on Oculus Home without using Revive. I'm not nearly as interested in ALVR + Revive on Oculus Home as I am testing the fully fledged Link features wirelessly.  

I wouldn't even mind if I have to jump through a lot of hoops to try this. I get that most people can't get a fast local speed with a low latency over wifi. I don't think it would be poisoning the well if Oculus made wireless Link features tedious to enable, but I totally understand if this doesn't end up getting supported. I just wanted to make my case and see if I could change anyone's mind about it. I was crossing my fingers for this to be a launch feature, but I do realize how incredibly unlikely that is. 

I would love to compare my wireless setup to the tethered experience on day 1!  


theres a big gap between 150MB/s using a cable or 300mbit/s using wlan.
You need 1500mbit/s to get 150MB/s comparable speed.
Bit or Byte makes a huge difference 🙂



You're mixing up megabytes (MB) with megabits (Mb). The Quest is capable of 150 megabits, not megabytes. Furthermore, there's 8 bits to a byte, so 150 megabits (Mb) comes to only 18.75 megabytes (MB).

vargablood
Level 5

Spuzzum said:






You're mixing up megabytes (MB) with megabits (Mb). The Quest is capable of 150 megabits, not megabytes. Furthermore, there's 8 bits to a byte, so 150 megabits (Mb) comes to only 18.75 megabytes (MB).


I dont know quest capability of maximum data transfer. But he was talking about the cable oculus will build for link and iam sure thats transfer rate is not 150mbit. next iam sure is wlan is doing 300mbit - not 300MB/s as he said.
You can copy files with 40MEGABYTE/s to quest using original cables and even twice faster if youre using better cables. I dont know where those 150mbit limit often posted in the forum come from.