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Would a bigger television get me back into Pancake gaming?

RedRizla
Level 15
I really like VR, but the lack of AAA games is making me feel I also need to get back into pancake gaming. I currently have a 42" television and I'm just wondering if I get a 55" or 65" television, if this will get me more immersed in a game like VR does? Since VR came along I've struggled to get back into 2D gaming and there's some really good pancake games that will never come to VR.

So do you think a lager screen would get me more immersed in a game or not?
288 REPLIES 288

Digikid1
Level 12
Grab a Xbox One X. Best console around and it is the best 4K HDR player as well. For a TV like that anything else will be unworthy. 

Also get that tv off the floor!!!!  LOL

RuneSR2
Level 15

Digikid1 said:

Grab a Xbox One X. Best console around and it is the best 4K HDR player as well. For a TV like that anything else will be unworthy. 

Also get that tv off the floor!!!!  LOL



In a week or two one of my friends will bring his Xbox One X and we'll test it thoroughly - looking forward to that 🙂

Due to its size the TV works great on the floor (at least for now), I don't have to look up too much B) Had a 42" on a stand before - but the 85" is about 10" taller (with no stand). 

Valve Index & Oculus Rift CV1, Asus Strix OC RTX™ 3090, i9-10900K (5.3Ghz), 32GB 3200MHz, 8TB
"Ask not what VR can do for you, but what you can do for VR"

pyroth309
Level 14
Yea all of the consoles are little more than false advertising on the 4k. The Xbox one X does run a few older titles at native 4k but the rest are upscaled. HDR isn't bad to setup on the PC if you have a late model TV which yours appears to be. It's a toggle switch and then calibrating the colors, not a big deal.

pyroth309
Level 14

RuneSR2 said:


Digikid1 said:

Grab a Xbox One X. Best console around and it is the best 4K HDR player as well. For a TV like that anything else will be unworthy. 

Also get that tv off the floor!!!!  LOL



In a week or two one of my friends will bring his Xbox One X and we'll test it thoroughly - looking forward to that 🙂

Due to its size the TV works great on the floor (at least for now), I don't have to look up too much B) Had a 42" on a stand before - but the 85" is about 10" taller (with no stand). 


I was going to add, I also have a GTX 1080 and I can run most games in 4k with 60 fps with some settings tweaks. For the most graphical/GPU heavy games you won't get 60 fps on Ultra settings but reducing aliasing and shadows and some other gpu heavy features usually gets me to 60 with no prob. The 1080TI and above are probably your true 4k 60hz cards with ultra settings. It's doubtful the PS5/Xbox will even be as powerful as a regular 1080...but they do have the advantage of a fixed hardware setup to optimize for.

RedRizla
Level 15
@RuneSR2

I made a thread here and this was people's replies to HDR on PC. Hence why I recommended waiting for PlayStation 5..

https://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2018/03/20/hdr-for-pc-games-2018/

https://forums.oculusvr.com/community/discussion/73093/didnt-know-hdr-for-pc-gaming-was-so-difficult...

Digikid1
Level 12

pyroth309 said:

Yea all of the consoles are little more than false advertising on the 4k. The Xbox one X does run a few older titles at native 4k but the rest are upscaled.


Not entirely correct. The Xbox One X does that for the older games but all the new ones are TRUE 4K. 

pyroth309
Level 14

Digikid1 said:


pyroth309 said:

Yea all of the consoles are little more than false advertising on the 4k. The Xbox one X does run a few older titles at native 4k but the rest are upscaled.


Not entirely correct. The Xbox One X does that for the older games but all the new ones are TRUE 4K. 


Ah it does do native 4k 30fps a lot more now, my bad. I haven't looked at it much recently. Still 30 fps...*shudder* lol.

Here's an actual list of the HDR games on PC. As I mentioned in the other thread, results do vary, but when it works great it's awesome.


To me, if you already own the GTX 1080 and the HDR TV, why not play around with it for yourself over waiting a year or more for a console with less Tflops than you already have? Sure, It does requires a little more configuration than consoles but most people who complain about it haven't tried the current version of Windows where it's vastly improved from the dumpster fire it used to be. It does have a ways to go to be perfect but it works. It's a toggle switch and then a couple calibration sliders (after you calibrate your TV properly which you'd have to do for consoles also) and then it's just normal calibration in each game in the options. The only game so far I had a major pain getting HDR to work right was Destiny 2 and that was due to destiny 2 itself having a bug with their setup. This article details it better than I can. https://www.criticalhit.net/gaming/destiny-2s-hdr-isnt-actually-broken-calibration-tools-misleading/

Personally, I'm a PC user/gamer, having to configure and optimize comes with just about everything I play so it's really nothing out of the ordinary to me. But I digress and off to play more HDR games lol.

*edit* As I mentioned in that other thread, if anyone tries to play in HDR on PC, make sure you fully update windows and if your desktop looks funky, mess with the SDR content slider until it looks good. Enjoy

*Edit2* On a sidenote, the most unfortunate thing about "HDR" to me is the vague standard of what HDR is and this is a problem for consoles as well. I see so many TV's labeled as HDR that have like 300 nits or even less of brightness which pretty much guarantees any HDR benefits will be lost with that. A good screen is the most important thing. I hope with the new HDR10+ that's rolling out, things will be more consistent.

MAC_MAN86
Level 9
For FPS yes. For sims no!

RuneSR2
Level 15
My slow - but free - internet connection doesn't allow for Netflix 4K streaming, but I found out that if you pay for Netflix Premium then you get HDR also in 1080p content. Tried it last night and I wasn't overly impressed. Not that it didn't work - it sure did, had me grasping for sunglasses already when the bright Netflix logo appeared. HDR does look more like normal daylight, and my new TV sure can provide an awesome amount of light, but experiencing such bright light watching movies late at night felt like too much. After checking the internet I can see that I'm not alone - even OLED users have been complaining, including that the Netflix subtitles are way too bright when using HDR  - I did experience that too. After a couple of hours I decided to downgrade my Netflix to standard HD. I'll probably buy a 4K player and enjoy true 4K + HDR in some select movies, but I don't think I need HDR on by default (without any ability to turn it off - using a Sony 4K player it should be possible to turn off HDR in Netflix though). 

Did also try some Android gaming on the TV - because it's an Android TV. Several games didn't work, seemed like they needed some kind of low level access that couldn't be provided. Asphalt 8 did install correctly, but trying to agree to the EULA the game hung. Leo's Forune did work (felt like 60 fps), but it's in 1080p and it seems like all the TV's advanced image enhancement tech is disabled when gaming, so it just looked like 1080p blown up, but at least it worked perfectly with the Dualshock controller.

https://youtu.be/uXX98NbdhR0

Unfortunately several games seemed to accept the 4K resolution, but the build-in TV computer doesn't have the power to provide anywhere near 60 fps 4K gaming (of course), I think I get about 20 to 30 fps in Crossy Road:

https://youtu.be/a3pTw0jmxlg

Bombsquad did work - again I believe in 4K, because I get like 28 fps:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iob-dlqMev8

I only have one Bluetooth Dualshock controller (bought for my Sony Experia phone), and single-player in Bombsquad isn't much fun. 

My final test was to purchase This War of Mine:

https://youtu.be/BALBUyoTxQM

Unfortunately - like most other games - the Dualshock controller wasn't supported (but XBox One controllers are supported) - and the game started up in 4K and that didn't work well. I probably got like 10 fps  :# The game did look great on the 85" TV though.

So playing Android games directly on the 4K Android TV wasn't really any fun - and it may take some patience finding games that really work. My problems:

1. Many games seem to launch in 4K requiring way more GPU power than current Android TVs provide.
2. You'll have to use the correct Bluetooth controller, and Dualshock isn't supported correctly in most/many games.
3. Very few Android games support Android TV - at least only 7 games seem fully supported on my TV, and several of those didn't even work well (=lack of Dualshock controller support).
4. Several games may have other issues and may not launch, even if you're able to install them - it easily gets frustrating. 

In short - Android gaming on 4K Android TVs may be quite limited fun, if any. For now I'll probably avoid it. For gaming on a 4K TV, I guess the only great option for now is a high-end PC (and maybe the XBox One X).

Couldn't help but thinking - why waste my precious time on such poor phone/tablet games when I got the Rift in my man cave  😄 But at least it was fun to observe and test that you can actually play some pancake games on new TVs without using external computers/consoles. Could be awesome in 10 years  B)

Valve Index & Oculus Rift CV1, Asus Strix OC RTX™ 3090, i9-10900K (5.3Ghz), 32GB 3200MHz, 8TB
"Ask not what VR can do for you, but what you can do for VR"

RuneSR2
Level 15
It's not all roses and violets - introducing another First World problem  :#

Although I'd swear my problems aren't at all like these  o:)

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In short - before the new TV I truly loved my 51" 3D Samsung plasma TV - we've spent countless of hours together, it has nanosecond response time - 16 ms. input lag in PC mode - and it's still ok for gaming when I sit close to it. But I just tried to watch a movie and had to stop - it felt like I was sitting in front of a 14" TV in the early 1980s. Before upgrading to 85" I had a 42" in the living room - and this happened:

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The new TV felt big - really big - and it still feels like sitting in a real cinema (back row :blush:). But after some 20 hours I've habituated to the new TV and this happened - much like it did to CRTs when I got my first large LCD TV many years ago :#

k0bj0xmi2g5i.png

So TVs around me are shrinking - it's incredible - much like this movie!  😄

https://youtu.be/VnDfrveCADo

Recently I've been to several electronic stores, even the kids notice it, all TVs have shrunken in size, 50" feels so tiny  😞 Computer monitors are ok, I guess it's because you're sitting very close to these screens, my phone is still ok too, but watching movies on smaller TVs has become a pain.  

The take home message: be careful when buying a TV much larger than what you're already use, it may totally ruin the joy of using a smaller TV. Ok, maybe that is a First World problem  😮

Nothing beats VR though - Rift is like an unlimited screen - no matter the size of a 2D screen I believe the Rift/VR (360 degrees) will always feel much bigger. Getting a big TV hasn't changed how much I love to watch short films in Oculus Video. When the SDE goes completely away and the HMD res can support watching true 4K movies like in a cinema, I don't think any 2D screen will be my first choice for watching movies (unless it's together with friends or/and family). But we're not there yet, although it's getting close. 

Valve Index & Oculus Rift CV1, Asus Strix OC RTX™ 3090, i9-10900K (5.3Ghz), 32GB 3200MHz, 8TB
"Ask not what VR can do for you, but what you can do for VR"